CT Child Support Guidelines

STATE OF CONNECTICUT

COMMISSION FOR CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES

Child Support

and

Arrearage Guidelines

Effective August 1, 2005

This booklet contains the Child Support and Arrearage Guidelines regulations adopted by the Commission for Child Support Guidelinespursuant to CGS 46b-215a.

The Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations and prescribed worksheet are included as a part of the regulations.

The booklet also includes an unofficial explanatory preambleto the regulations that the Commission developed to assist the guidelines user.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preamble to Child Support and Arrearage Guidelines

(a) Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. i

(b) Summary of Changes……………………………………………………………………………………………..i-ii

(c) Purpose of guidelines …………………………………………………………………………………. ii

(d) Basic principles …………………………………………………………………………………………………. ii-iii

(e) The Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations …… …………………………………………….iii-vi

(f) Guidelines worksheet…………………………………………………………………………………………… vi

(g) Applicability of child support guidelines …………………………………………………………………..vii-ix

(h) Income determination …………………………………………………………………………………………..ix-xi

(i) Arrearage guidelines ……………………………………………………………………………………………..xi-xii

(j) Deviation criteria…………………………………………………………………………………………………. xii-xiii

(k) The guidelines commission and review process ……………………………………………………….. xiii-xiv

(l) Effective date……………………………………………………………………………………………………… xiv

Child Support and Arrearage Guidelines Regulations

Section 46b-215a-1. Definitions ……………………………………………………………………………. 1-4

Section 46b-215a-2b. Child support guidelines……………………………………………………….. 5-20

(a) Applicability……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

(b) Using the worksheet…………………………………………………………………………………………… 5

(c) Determining the amount of current support …………………………………………………………….. 5-8

(d) Determining the amount of current support in split custody situations…………………………….. 8

(e) Determining the amount of current support when another child resides with a parent ……….. 8-9

(f) Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations………………………………………………………9-17

(g) Determining the health care coverage contribution ……………………………………………………..18-19

(h) Determining the child care contribution…………………………………………………………………….19-20

Section 46b-215a-3. Deviation criteria……………………………………………………………………. 21-23

(a) Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21

(b) Criteria for deviation from presumptive support amounts……………………………………………..21-23

Section 46b-215a-4a. Arrearage guidelines ……………………………………………………………. 23-25

(a) Scope of section ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 23

(b) General rule ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23

(c) Special rule for low-income obligors ……………………………………………………………………..23-24

(d) Special rule if there is no current support order……………………………………………………….. 24

(e) Special rule for child living with the obligor …………………………………………………………….. 24

(f) Use of the worksheet in arrearage determinations ……………………………………………………..24-25

Section 46b-215a-5b. Worksheet for the Connecticut child support and arrearage guidelines …………………………………………………………………………………………..25-27

– i –

PREAMBLE TO CHILD SUPPORT AND ARREARAGE GUIDELINES

(a) Introduction This preamble is intended to assist users of the childsupport and arrearage guidelines but is not part of theofficial regulations.

(1) Purposes of preamble The purposes of this preamble to the child support and arrearage guidelines are the following:

(A) To identify for child support practitioners, judges, family support magistrates, and the public changes from the former child support guidelines to ease the transition to the new guidelines.

(B) To provide supplemental background information to assist the user in understanding the purposes and principles underlying the guidelines.

(C) To limit the need for explanations and commentary in the guidelines to keep them simple and readable.

(D) To provide for uniformity of interpretation by the Connecticut bar, judiciary, child support agencies, and the public.

(2) Organization of the regulations The child support and arrearage guidelines regulations are organized into five sections, as follows:

(A) Section 46b-215a-1. Definitions This section contains definitions of key words and phrases that have a special meaning as used in the guidelines.

(B) Section 46b-215a-2b. Child support guidelines This section contains the guidelines, including the worksheet instructions and schedule, for determining the current support, health care coverage, and child care contribution components of the child support award.

(C) Section 46b-215a-3. Child support guidelines deviation criteria This section describes the circumstances that may justify a support order different from the presumptive support amounts calculated under the child support and arrearage guidelines.

(D) Section 46b-215a-4a. Arrearage guidelines This section contains the guidelines, including the worksheet instructions, for determining periodic payments on child support arrearages.

(E) Section 46b-215a-5b. Worksheet for the Connecticut child support and arrearage guidelines This section contains the worksheet intended for use with the instructions in sections 46b-215a-2b and 46b-215a-4a.

(b) Summary of changes This subsection of the preamble identifies the differences between the new guidelines and the 1999 guidelines to quickly orient those who are familiar with the guidelines to the changes. Purely technical changes, such as renumbering, punctuation, or minor language changes that do not significantly alter the meaning of the provision are omitted from this discussion. More formation on the reasons for significant changes is found later in the preamble. The changes are listed in the order they appear in the regulations.

(1) Allowable deductions from gross income

Medical insurance premium deduction now includes amount for the child whose support is being determined.

Husky Plan contributions added.

Court-ordered life insurance for the benefit of the child added.

Court-ordered disability insurance added.

Union dues deduction now limited to amounts deducted by the employer.

The cost of mandatory uniforms and tools, if deducted by the employer, added.

(2) Gross income

Maximum hourly wages included in gross income reduced from 52 to 45 hours per week.

Tribal stipends and incentives added as a gross income inclusion.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) exclusion clarified to apply to payments for a child.

Adoption subsidy benefits for the child added as a gross income inclusion.

Limitation of education grants inclusion changed from amounts available for personal living expenses to amounts that are federally taxable.

(3) Net disposable income

80% of any alimony paid by one of the parents to the other is now added to the net income of the receiving parent, and deducted from the net income of the paying parent, in the calculation of net disposable income, for purposes of calculating unreimbursed medical and child care contribution amounts.

Social security dependency benefits for the child on the earnings record of the noncustodial parent are now added to the net income of the custodial parent in the calculation of net disposable income, for purposes of calculating unreimbursed medical and child care contribution amounts.

– ii –

(4) Schedule extension to higher incomes

The upper limit of the schedule of basic obligations was increased from $2,500 combined net weekly income to $4,000 combined net weekly income.

(5) Current support computation

Supplemental orders, based on future lump sum payments of an unknown amount, are now specifically allowed.

The custodial parent’s income is no longer considered in determining the basic child support obligation if the noncustodial parent is a low-income obligor.

Health insurance premium amounts for the child are no longer added to the basic obligation.

(6) Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations

The schedule now begins at $50, instead of $10, per week.

The white italics are eliminated.

The low-income obligor area is extended to slightly higher incomes.

The percentages and dollar amounts are adjusted based on updated economic data.

(7) Health care coverage

Child’s health insurance premium is no longer deducted from the basic child support obligation of a low-income obligor.

Low-income obligors are now exempt from Husky Plan contributions.

The low-income obligor’s responsibility for payment of unreimbursed expenses is now limited to 50%.

The first $100 per child per year of unreimbursed medical expenses is no longer excluded from the order for payment of unreimbursed medical expenses.

(8) Child care contribution

Child care subsidy payments are now specifically excluded from qualifying costs.

Low-income obligors are no longer exempt from a child care contribution.

Special rules for low-income obligors apply to obligors with net disposable income in the low income area of the schedule.

The child care contribution of a low-income obligor is limited to 50%.

The child care contribution of a low-income obligor is 20% when the custodial parent’s net disposable income is outside the low-income area of the schedule.

(9) Deviation criteria

Agreements of the parties citing one or more deviation criteria, if accepted by the court, may be sufficient to rebut presumptive support amounts.

Deviation criteria are specifically limited to the lettered items, and do not include the category headings.

Wages for work between 45 and 52 hours per week added as a deviation criterion under certain circumstances.

Child care expenses for a qualified child added as a criterion for deviation from the child care contribution.

Extraordinary disparity in parental incomes added as a deviation criterion.

(10) Arrearage guidelines

Determination of periodic payments on child support arrearages clarified as subject to the deviation criteria.

(11) Worksheet

Kept to two pages, but complex calculations broken down to simpler steps, current support calculation shortened, arrearage payment calculation simplified, and space to check off applicable deviation criteria added.

(c) Purposes of guidelines

The primary purposes of the child support and arrearage guidelines are:

(1) To provide uniform procedures for establishing an adequate level of support for children, and for repayment of child support arrearages, subject to the ability of parents to pay.

(2) To make awards more equitable by ensuring the consistent treatment of persons in similar circumstances.

(3) To improve the efficiency of the court process by promoting settlements and by giving courts and the parties guidance in setting the levels of awards.

(4) To conform to applicable federal and state statutory and regulatory mandates.

(d) Basic principles

The Connecticut Child Support Guidelines are based on the Income Shares Model. The Income Shares Model presumes that the child should receive the same proportion of parental income as he or she would have received if the parents lived together. Underlying the income shares model, therefore, is the policy that the parents should bear any additional expenses resulting from the maintenance of two separate households instead of one, since it is not the child’s decision that the parents divorce, separate, or otherwise live separately. The Income Shares Model has proven to be the most widely accepted, particularly due to its consideration of the income of both parents. About two-thirds of the states follow the income shares model, and of four states that changed from one model to another in the past ten years, three converted to the income shares model. Other models used by states include “Percentage of Obligor Income" (about a quarter of the states) and – iii – “Melson Formula" or a hybrid approach. Only a handful of states use the Melson or another model. The Income Shares Model reflects presently available data on the average costs of raising children in households across a wide range of incomes and family sizes. Because household spending on behalf of children is intertwined with spending on behalf of adults for most expenditure categories, it is difficult to determine the exact proportion allocated to children in individual cases, even with exhaustive financial affidavits. However, a number of authoritative economic studies based on national data provide reliable estimates of the average amount of household expenditures on children in intact households. These studies have found that the proportion of household spending devoted to children is systematically and consistently related to the level of household income and to the number of children. In general, the economic studies have found that spending on children declines as a proportion of family income as that income increases, and a diminishing portion of family income is spent on each additional child. More is explained later in the preamble about the first observation. The second observation apparently results from two factors. The first is economy of scale. That is, as more children are added to a family, sharing of household items is increased, and fewer of those items must be purchased. The second is a reallocation of expenditures. That is, as additional children are added, each family member’s share of expenditures decreases to provide for the needs of the additional members. Based on this economic evidence, adjusted for Connecticut’s relatively high income distribution (as explained later in this preamble), the guidelines allow for the calculation of current support based on each parent’s share of the amount estimated to be spent on a child if the parents and child live in an intact household. The amount calculated for the custodial parent is retained by the custodial parent and presumed spent on the child.The amount calculated for the noncustodial parent establishes the level of current support to be ordered by the court. These two amounts together constitute the current support obligation of both parents for the support of the child. Intact households are used for the estimates because the guidelines aim to provide children the same support they would receive if the parents lived together. More than this, however, support amounts would be set unduly low if based on spending patterns of singleparent families, as they generally experience a high incidence of poverty and lower incomes than intact families.

(e) The Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations

This subsection of the preamble explains how the commission derived the percentages in the Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations (hereafter, the schedule), and how and why the new schedule is different from the one in the 1999 guidelines. The commission contracted with Policy Studies, Inc. of Denver, Colorado to develop a new schedule based on more recent economic data, to incorporate changes in the low-income area, and to extend the schedule to higher incomes.

(1) Updated economic data

Federal regulations for the Title IV-D child support enforcement program (45 CFR 302.56) require among other things that the guidelines review process include a consideration of economic data on the cost of raising children. The schedule percentages included in the 1994 and 1999 guidelines were based on economic data on child-rearing costs gathered in a study mandated by the Family Support Act of 1988 (P.L. 100-485, section 128). The study was conducted by Dr. David Betson of Notre Dame University, through the University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty. Dr. Betson used data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 1980-86 Consumer Expenditure Survey for his research. An analysis of Dr. Betson’s findings, on which prior commissions relied, is contained in Estimates of Expenditures on Children and Child Support Guidelines, Report to U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation), by Lewin/ICF (October 1990). The present commission was fortunate, through its retained consultant, to have access to Dr. Betson’s updated measurements of child-rearing costs, which were developed in 2001 based on 1996-1999 Consumer Expenditure Survey data. In addition, the contractor converted Dr. Betson’s measurements to 2004 price levels. The Consumer Expenditure Survey data includes information on several hundred items purchased by households. The Bureau of Labor Statistics categorizes these items into several major categories, such as food, housing, clothing, transportation, and health care. Mortgage principal payments are excluded from measurements of current consumption, as they constitute a form of savings. Mortgage interest payments and property taxes, however, are included as items of current consumption, as is rent. Other exclusions from current consumption are personal insurance, savings, pension and charitable contributions, and purchase price of vehicles. The commission notes that the identification of spending categories for the development of estimates of expenditures on children does not translate well into an obligation for parents to spend specific portions of their own income, or support payments received from the other parent, on particular categories of items for their children. As stated earlier in this preamble, spending on children and adults in families is inextricably intertwined, and the commission specifically rejects a requirement on the part of the custodial parent to provide for an accounting of how support payments, or the custodial parent’s portion of the presumptive current support obligation, are used to provide for the child. An accounting requirement would represent an unreasonable administrative burden on courts and administrative agencies, and would be extremely intrusive for custodial parents. The commission does not believe it is appropriate for the government to micromanage family finances. – iv – On the other hand, where it can be shown that a parent’s failure to provide for a child rises to the level of neglect, it certainly is appropriate for individuals to enlist the help of appropriate courts or agencies to assess the appropriateness of a custody change or other measures to ensure the child’s welfare. The foregoing being said, however, the commission emphasizes that it is the obligation of both parents to contribute to the support of their children to the extent of their ability, as defined by the guidelines and ordered by the courts. The obligation to support does not rest solely with the parent who is ordered to make payments to the other parent. It extends also to the parent receiving those court-ordered payments. In addition to spending the designated support payments on the child, the parent receiving such payments remains obligated to expend a portion of his or her own personal income on the child’s behalf. The specific percentage expected to be spent is identical, absent application of a deviation criterion, to the percentage allocated by the other parent, as established by the schedule.

(2) Rothbarth estimator

Economists determine the average household spending on children by comparing the expenditures of two households that are equally well off economically, one with children and one without. To make this comparison, they must first determine a standard of well-being which is independent of income. The Rothbarth estimator (named for Erwin Rothbarth, the economist who first proposed it) is such a standard. It is based on the percentage of household income spent on adult goods, and the commission continues to regard it as the best benchmark to use in developing guidelines. It is the most widely used standard among states that have updated their guidelines based on newer child-rearing cost data.

(3) Adjustment for Connecticut

The data reported by Betson using the Rothbarth estimator (hereafter, Betson/Rothbarth) were developed using a nationally representative sample of households. Connecticut, however, has an income structure that is much higher than the national average. This fact, in the commission’s judgment, continues to warrant an upward adjustment to the Betson/Rothbarth percentages, for the following reasons: (A) A Connecticut household can be expected to spend about the same percentage of income on children as a nationally representative household with a lower level of income because of the Connecticut household’s relative position in the state’s income distribution. (B) Households with lower levels of income generally spend a higher proportion of their income on children. The amount of the upward adjustment in the new schedule was calculated with reference to 2002 Census data indicating differences in family income between Connecticut and the national average.

(4) Percentage decline as income increases

(A) Reason for decline Economic evidence establishes that the proportion of household income spent on children declines as household income increases. This spending pattern exists because families at higher income levels do not have to devote most or all of their incomes to perceived necessities. Rather, they can allocate some proportion of income to savings and other non-consumption expenditures, as well as discretionary adult goods. This principle was reflected in the 1994 and 1999 guidelines, and is also incorporated in the new guidelines.

(B) Decline at all income levels Connecticut’s pre-1994 child support guidelines built in a decline in the percentages beginning at the $750 combined net weekly income level. The new guidelines follow the pattern of the 1994 and 1999 guidelines and incorporate declining percentages at all levels of combined net weekly income outside the darker shaded area of the schedule. This approach is consistent with the income shares model, and the degree of decline is based on the most reliable economic indicators.

(5) Low-income adjustments

(A) A historical perspective One of the continuing themes that surfaced throughout the Commission’s review process was the challenge of striking an appropriate balance between the interests of parents and children in the setting of a child support award when one or both parents are of extremely limited means. On the one hand is the child’s interest in sharing equitably in the parents’ income, consistent with the income shares model. On the other hand is the low income parent’s need to retain sufficient income to provide for his or her own subsistence, in order to permit such parent to play a positive role in the child’s life. Previous commissions have resolved this inherent tension in various ways. For example, the 1994 and prior commissions established an income level below which a noncustodial parent would have no responsibility for child support payments. This approach created an unvarying self-support reserve, which absolutely protected a subsistence level of income for the nonresident parent, but failed to even minimally assist the resident parent, who frequently was also low-income, in providing for the child. It also failed to convey the important message to both parents that an obligation to support exists even where the ability is limited. Where the 1994 commission went further than prior commissions, however, was in the establishment of a variable self-support reserve for obligors whose income was above subsistence level but still relatively low. The variable self-support reserve applied in the area of the schedule identified by dark shading; and in this area usually only the noncustodial parent’s income was considered in setting the basic child support obligation. The effect of the variable self-support reserve was to preserve for the low-income obligor an ever-increasing level of earnings as net income increased to the point at which the income shares model was applied. The 1999 commission built on the work of the 1994 commission by retaining the concept of a variable selfsupport reserve, applicable in the darker shaded area of the schedule, but eliminated the absolute protection for obligors with poverty level incomes and below. It did so by substituting a minimal obligation of 10% of net income for one child, and gradually increasing amounts for additional children, up to about the poverty level. From that level on, obligations increased in approximately equal intervals until the point at which the obligor retained about $170 per week, after the payment of child support. Beyond that level, the income shares model applied, and combined income was used to set the support obligation. The principle underlying the 1999 commission’s imposition of a minimal order even at poverty levels was the underlying public policy making parents primarily responsible for the support of their children. In accordance with this policy, the 1999 commission viewed it as crucial to require an order of a specific amount of child support, no matter how minimal, in almost every case.

The commission cited the lack of a self-support reserve for custodial parents and the advent of time-limited public assistance benefits as further justification for the imposition of a support order in most cases.

(B) Low-income adjustments in the new schedule The present commission recognizes that in lowincome families where the parents reside in two separate households, there will inevitably be immense financial pressures on both parents to maintain themselves and their children adequately. Nonetheless, the commission returned repeatedly in its deliberations to a concern for the best interests of the child. It therefore continues to prescribe minimal support payments for even very low income noncustodial parents, but has tempered this determination with several further adjustments in the low-income area of the schedule, in an effort to build upon and refine the commendable work of previous commissions.

(i) No obligation for parents with less than $50 net income The commission determined that child support obligations for noncustodial parents earnings less than $50 per week net income should be eliminated, despite its adherence to the principles enunciated by the 1999 commission regarding imposition of obligations in lowincome cases. Parents with such extremely low income are in truly desperate circumstances, and their first concern, even before the payment of a child support obligation, understandably is their own economic survival. The commission also deemed the $1 to $5 that would be expected of such parents under the 1999 guidelines primarily symbolic and, from a judicial and agency perspective, an unwarranted administrative burden to record, process, and enforce.

(ii) Increased range of low-income area The 1999 guidelines phased out the low-income, darker shaded area of the schedule at the point where the obligor retained about $170 per week net income. The present commission has extended the reach of the protections associated with this area of the schedule by increasing to approximately $190 per week the level of net income at which the low-income designation ceases to apply. The effect of this change is not only to deflate the required support contribution for borderline low income obligors, but also to extend to such obligors the additional protections accorded such obligors under other provisions of the guidelines, which are addressed elsewhere in this preamble.

(iii) Lower percentages in the darker shaded area The commission also slightly reduced most of the percentages in the low-income area of the schedule. Contributing factors to these reductions are the raising of the shaded area cut-off points and the lowering of many amounts outside the low-income area, particularly for three or more children. In the commission’s view, these reductions will ultimately work to the benefit of children, while serving the immediate self-support needs of low-income obligors, since they will assist such obligors in establishing a pattern of payment based on realistic expectations of their ability to pay.

(iv) Elimination of white italics As under the 1999 guidelines, there are some instances in the new schedule where the percentage indicated in the darker shaded area exceeds that which applies if the combined net income is used. These instances occur, in general, when the custodial parent’s income is high relative to that of the noncustodial parent. The reason for this occurrence is the steady decline in percentages as combined income increases.The 1999 guidelines used white italics within the darker shaded area to indicate those income levels where use of combined income could possibly result in a lower support percentage for the low-income obligor. Where the white italics applied, the guidelines user would have to compare the support amount using the obligor’s income alone with the support amount using combined income to determine the lesser amount, and then use the lesser amount as the basic child support obligation. The present commission has determined that the former approach unduly complicates the support calculation in view of the small number of cases where the procedure results in an obligation different from one based solely on the obligor’s income. The commission accordingly has eliminated the white italics from the schedule, consistent with its efforts in other areas to simplify the guidelines. The result is that the basic child support obligation of the low-income obligor is determined under the present regulations without reference to the custodial parent’s income in all cases, subject to possible application of the deviation criterion for extraordinary disparity in parental income, which is addressed further in the deviation criteria section of this preamble.

(6) Extension to higher incomes The 1999 schedule applied only up to $2,500 combined net weekly income, since the data available to the previous commission would not support extension to higher incomes. The present commission has extended the applicable range of the schedule to $4,000 combined net weekly income, in response to comments from the public and many practicing family law attorneys, and in view of the commission’s aim to promote consistency in the setting of support orders at all income levels. This extension is justified at this time by the use of newer measurements of child-rearing costs, derived from 1996-1999 Consumer Expenditure Survey data that included higher income families. As under earlier guidelines, courts remain free to fashion appropriate child support awards on a case-by-case basis where the combined income exceeds the range of the schedule, provided the amount of support prescribed at the $4,000 level is presumed to be the minimum that should be ordered in such cases.

(f) Guidelines worksheet The commission continues to prescribe a worksheet for use in calculating support amounts under the child support and arrearage guidelines. While the revised worksheet looks similar to the one included in the former regulations, and still takes up only the front and back of one sheet of paper, it is different in a number of important respects.

(1) Heading The heading is identical, except for reformatting of the space to write in the children’s names and dates of birth, and inclusion of a statement concerning the permissive rounding of money amounts. The child information now fits on two lines, permitting increased use of vertical space for additional items and calculations on the first page.

(2) Net income calculations The main change in this section of the worksheet is the addition of an area for calculating the imputed support obligation for a qualified child. The commission added lines 12a through 12d for the purpose of breaking down the fairly complex calculation into a few simpler steps. The intent is to assist the user of the guidelines in correctly performing the necessary calculations. The commission also added lines in this section to correspond with the additional allowable deductions included in the regulations, and re-organized the lines for tax deductions to group the federal items together. Finally, there is now space on the gross income line to indicate the number of work hours used to calculate gross income.

(3) Current support calculation The commission shortened this section from twelve lines to six. This was possible primarily because health insurance premiums for the child are no longer added to the basic obligation and apportioned between the parents, so the lines for these calculations could be removed. Also absent is the line for the recommended current support order, which now appears only in the recommended orders section on the second page.

(4) Net disposable income calculation This is a new section, which the commission added due to the increased complexity of the net disposable income calculation. The section breaks down the computations into several simple steps to direct the user to the appropriate result, which now reflects the impact of alimony and social security dependency benefits.

(5) Unreimbursed medical expense calculation The commission provided more explicit instructions for calculating each parent’s percentage contribution, and inserted additional instructions to reflect the special treatment for low-income obligors.

(6) Child care contribution calculation The commission removed the space for qualifying costs, since such costs change over time and do not affect the calculation of the child care contribution percentage. The section is expanded to incorporate the special rules for calculating the child care contribution of low-income obligors.

(7) Arrearage payment calculation This section of the worksheet is condensed to reflect the commission finding that the lengthy and involved calculations in the former worksheet were unnecessary in the majority of cases. Now there is space to record the presumptive amount of twenty percent of the current support payment. In addition, there are special instructions for calculating, and a separate space to record, the presumptive amount when the special circumstances identified in the worksheet exist.

(8) Deviation criteria This section of the worksheet is expanded to include a listing of all the criteria with a check box for the user to indicate which, if any, criteria are being cited to rebut the presumptive support amounts.

(9) Recommended orders The commission changed the title of this section from “order summary" to “recommended orders" to clarify that the purpose of the section is to record the proposed order amounts, not the orders issued by the court. Space is added to record the presumptive current support amount, for comparison with the recommended order. The unreimbursed medical expense line now prompts for entry of percentage amounts for the mother and father. The child care contribution line has space to record either a percentage amount or a dollar amount in cases of noncompliance with a previous order. A line is also added to record any additional proposed orders, such as a supplemental order to pay a percentage of a future lump sum payment of an indeterminate amount, as now authorized in the regulations.

(g) Applicability of child support guidelines

(1) Split custody situations When there is more than one child in common and each parent provides the primary residence of at least one of the children, there is a split custody situation. Under the pre-1994 guidelines, these situations were handled by computing a single obligation for all subject children, and then apportioning the obligation between the parents based on the number of children in the other parent’s custody. While this prorating approach was simple and reasonable, it was inconsistent with the income shares model. Because each additional child costs proportionately less to raise, the basic obligation for two children in a single household, for example, is less than that for two children living in separate households. The split custody adjustment under the pre-1994 guidelines, however, would use the basic obligation for two children in a single household to compute support for two children living separately. To correct this deficiency, the 1994 commission adopted an approach that uses the combined parental income to calculate separate obligations for the children of each household. These obligations are then offset to arrive at a single obligation which one parent pays to the other to correctly apportion their combined income based on a consistent application of the child support guidelines. The present commission continues to endorse this approach to the split custody situation, and has retained the applicable provisions unchanged from the 1999 guidelines.

(2) Cases where another child resides with a parent In an effort to improve the consistency of orders in which the needs of multiple families are involved, the 1999 commission eliminated the deviation criterion for needs of a parent’s prior or subsequent children in favor of a deduction from gross income in the amount of an imputed support obligation for a dependent child living with the parent. The present commission determined that this qualified child deduction works well and should continue unchanged from the 1999 guidelines. The amount of the allowable deduction for qualified children is calculated as follows. First, a current support obligation is calculated for all of the parent’s children, including those who are the subject of the support determination and those for whom the parent is seeking a gross income deduction. The other parent’s income is not considered in this calculation. Second, the resulting obligation is divided by the total number of the parent’s children, and the resulting amount is multiplied by the number of qualified children (those for whom the parent is claiming a deduction). The product is the total allowable deduction for all qualified children. While the deduction for qualified children accounts for the basic support needs of such children, it does not address any child care expenses attributable to them. Accordingly, the commission added a deviation criterion that may be used to reduce only the presumptive child care contribution for the child whose support is being determined. The new criterion is discussed more fully in the deviation criteria section of this preamble.

(3) Health care coverage contribution

(A) In general

The present commission recognizes, consistent with the determinations of the 1999 commission, that clear and adequate health care provisions must be included in the guidelines if they are to serve the best interests of the child. Such provisions are mandated by Title IV-D of the Social Security Act, implementing federal regulations and corresponding state law provisions. All states now have in their child support guidelines some provision for addressing the child’s health care needs. The commission accordingly has retained the requirement for each child support award entered under the guidelines to include a provision for either parent to contribute to the health care coverage of the child. The requirement may be met by an order to name the child as a beneficiary of health insurance carried by or available at reasonable cost to a parent. If such insurance is not available, the order must require application for Husky B or an equivalent government-sponsored plan, as available. Low-income obligors, however, are now exempt from Husky reimbursement orders under this subsection. (B) Change from “add-on" to deduction The primary change to the treatment of health care expenses in the present regulations is the elimination of the premium adjustment in the calculation of presumptive current support amounts. The commission determined that adding the child’s portion of any health insurance premiums paid by the parents to the basic obligation, apportioning the payment between the parents, and then subtracting the amount from the obligation of the parent who pays the premium increased the complexity of the child support determination, while adding nothing to benefit the child. A simpler approach, and one that adequately serves the child’s interest while remaining fair to the parents, is to deduct the child’s portion of the health insurance premium from the gross income of the parent who pays it. Further information on the allowable deduction for health insurance premiums is found in the “income determination" section of this preamble.

(C) Unreimbursed medical expenses

(i) Apportionment method

The commission has retained in the present regulations the basic method for apportioning unreimbursed medical expenses that was adopted by the 1999 commission. It did, however, adjust the calculation method by redefining “net disposable income," on which the apportionment is based. Previously, the guidelines user calculated net disposable income by deducting only the current support order amount from the noncustodial parent’s net income, and adding it to the custodial parent’s net income. Under the new guidelines, the user also deducts 80% of any alimony payments to the other parent from the net income of the parent paying the alimony, while adding the same amount to the net

– viii –

income of the parent receiving such alimony. A further adjustment is the addition of any social security dependency benefits for the child on the earnings record of the noncustodial parent to the custodial parent’s net income, and the deduction of the same amount from the noncustodial parent’s net income.

The combined effect of these adjustments to the net disposable income calculation, in the commission’s view, is a fairer allocation of responsibility for unreimbursed medical expenses between the parents. This is because the revised calculation method more accurately reflects the actual funds available to the parents after child support and alimony payments have changed hands, and credits the noncustodial parent for social security dependency benefits made on such parent’s behalf. Only 80% of the alimony payment enters into the net disposable income calculation, to account as simply as possible for the tax ramifications of such payment without further complicating the calculations.

(ii) Expenses subject to order

Under the 1999 guidelines, only those unreimbursed medical expenses that exceeded $100 per year for each child were subject to the apportionment order. The $100 figure represented an average amount included in the schedule of basic obligations to cover ordinary medical expenses. As part of its comprehensive effort to simplify the guidelines, the present commission eliminated the $100 expense threshold from the order provision, and adjusted the schedule accordingly by removing medical expenses from the child’s share of consumption spending.

(iii) Other issues

The commission continues in the present guidelines the policy of not exempting low-income obligors from payment of unreimbursed medical expenses. It also continues to include unreimbursed medical expenses as a reason for deviating from presumptive support amounts where such expenses are found to be extraordinary and to exist on a substantial and continuing basis.

(4) Child care contribution

(A) In general

The commission has retained the provision requiring the noncustodial parent to reimburse the custodial parent for a portion of the child care costs incurred on behalf of the subject child. Treating child care costs separately under the guidelines, as opposed to including an average amount for such costs in the schedule, is justified in the commission’s view because not all families incur this expense and costs vary widely depending on family circumstances. Provision for a separate contribution therefore permits the court to tailor the child support award to those circumstances.

(B) Qualifying costs

The costs subject to noncustodial parent reimbursement must be reasonable and necessary for the custodial parent to maintain employment. Amounts that are reimbursed or subsidized are excluded, as are amounts that exceed the level required to provide quality care from a licensed source. The commission refers courts and other guidelines users to the charts on average Connecticut child care costs that appear on the 2-1-1 Child Care Infoline internet website for information on determining the reasonableness of any claimed child care costs.

(C) Contribution amount

The noncustodial parent’s contribution to qualifying child care costs is set generally the same way as unreimbursed medical expenses are apportioned – on the basis of the parents’ net disposable incomes. The commission has redefined “net disposable income" in the present regulations to account for alimony payments and social security dependency benefits for the child on the earnings record of the noncustodial parent. The commission deems this the fairest way to apportion the child care costs because it is based on the actual funds available to the parents after child support and alimony payments have changed hands. There are special rules for low-income obligors, which are discussed below.

(D) Special rules for low-income obligors

(i) Elimination of exemption

The 1999 guidelines had exempted low-income obligors from the child care contribution order. While this approach was a clear benefit to low-income obligors, the present commission has determined that the establishment of reasonable limits on the contribution of such obligors is an approach that is fairer to custodial parents and in the best interests of the child.

(ii) Expansion of definition of “low-income obligor"

The commission expanded the definition of “lowincome obligor" only as the term is used to establish special child care contribution limits. For the purpose of setting those limits, the term includes obligors whose net disposable income falls within the darker shaded area of the schedule. This is in contrast to the definition as used elsewhere in the regulations, which includes only those obligors whose net income falls within the darker shaded area of the schedule. As a result of this expansive definition, the special contribution limits are extended to obligors whose income is relatively low but who would otherwise not benefit from the special limits.

(iii) Contribution limits

The child care contribution is generally set in accordance with the obligor’s percentage share of combined net disposable income. Under this general rule, an obligor could be required to pay well over half of the child care costs, if the obligor’s income is much more than the custodial parent’s. One of the special rules for low-income obligors, however, establishes a limit of 50% for the contribution of a low-income obligor toward the qualifying child care costs. The other special rule establishes the child care contribution at 20% of the qualifying costs when the custodial parent’s net disposable income is outside the darker shaded area of the schedule. The latter rule protects low-income

– ix –

obligors from potentially very burdensome contributions beyond the current support obligation in those cases where the custodial parent has considerably greater financial resources than the noncustodial parent.

(E) Coordination with schedule

The 1994 schedule incorporated in the percentages an average amount for child care expenses over the child’s minority, since child care was not treated as a separate obligation under the guidelines. The 1999 commission, on the other hand, established the policy, adhered to by the present commission, under which child care costs are apportioned between the parents, and made a separate component of the child support award. Consistent with this policy, the 1999 commission reduced the schedule percentages by an estimated amount for child care costs incurred over the child’s minority. The present commission has updated the amounts deducted from the schedule for average child care costs based on Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Survey data for the period 1996 through 1999, as provided by its retained consultant, Policy Studies, Inc. The consultant reported that child care costs per child tend generally to increase as a percentage of consumption spending as the level of income increases. Such costs in households with annual income less than $15,000 average 0.25%, while ranging to 1.70% in households with annual income of more than $150,000.

The commission recognizes that these amounts may seem low, particularly to parents presently paying child care costs for small children. These average amounts, however, are determined on the basis of total expenditures over the child’s entire minority, much of which time no costs are incurred, and they also include data from many families who use relatives rather than paid facilities for child care, families with parents who work at home and do not require outside child care, as well as families who receive a child care subsidy. The revised schedule incorporates deductions for average child care costs in graduated fashion in accordance with the updated data provided by the consultant. The commission has determined that these amounts are more reliable than the estimates on which the 1999 schedule adjustments were based.

(5) Orders beyond majority

The commission has eliminated potential ambiguity in the definition of “child" in the regulations by deleting the word “unemancipated". The definition formerly applied to “an unemancipated individual whose parents have a duty to provide support…" By removing the word “unemancipated" from the definition, the commission intends to eliminate any inconsistency with provisions in Public Act No. 04-100 that expand support liability under various support order statutes to parents of unmarried high school students under the age of nineteen, who could be considered emancipated for some purposes. Such liability already existed for parents subject to a decree of dissolution of marriage, legal separation or annulment, under section 46b-84(b) of the Connecticut General Statutes.

(6) Supplemental orders

The commission found that sometimes when a support order is being set the parties have knowledge of an anticipated future lump sum payment of an unknown amount, such as a bonus. While the expected amount may be substantial, the indeterminate nature of such payment precludes its inclusion in the gross income of the parent expected to receive it. In such cases, the commission has determined that the most practical way of considering the payment for purposes of establishing an appropriate amount of support is to treat the payment separately from the basic current support order, which is to be paid periodically.

Under the approach adopted by the commission, when the order is entered, the parties agree or the court orders that a percentage of the future lump sum payment shall be obligated as support upon receipt of the payment. Such percentage is to be generally consistent with the guidelines schedule. This approach maintains the integrity of the current support calculation method, since it does not attempt to include indeterminate or speculative amounts in a parent’s gross income. It also saves the parties from returning to court to modify the support order to account for receipt of the payment. The commission does not intend that this provision shall apply in every case. In fact, it views the provision as the exception rather than the rule, applicable in the limited circumstances specified in the regulation. The regulation still clearly provides that the primary element of a current support order is a specific dollar amount, which is payable periodically, such as weekly or monthly. If the amount of the future lump sum payment is reasonably ascertainable, it should be included in gross income, subject to the normal current support calculation procedures, and not addressed under this provision.

(h) Income determination

The regulations continue to use the parents’ net income, defined as gross income minus allowable deductions, as a basis for calculating the child support obligation. This subsection describes and explains the principle changes to the gross income inclusions and exclusions, and the allowable deductions, included in the new guidelines.

(1) Gross income

(A) Inclusions

Users of the guidelines should note that gross income includes all kinds of earned and unearned income not specifically excluded. The list of inclusions is illustrative and not exhaustive.

(i) Overtime and additional employment

The commission determined that inclusion of at least some parental income earned for hours worked in excess of 40 per week is justified by the principle that children – x –

should share equitably in the income of their parents. The commission finds it fair and appropriate, however, to prescribe some limitation on the number of hours to be included.

The 1999 guidelines had established 52 total paid hours per week for regular, overtime, and additional employment as the maximum to enter into the calculation of gross income for child support purposes. Subsequent to promulgation of the 1999 guidelines, however, the Connecticut General Assembly enacted section 32 of Public Act No. 99-279 (now codified as section 46b-215d of the Connecticut General Statutes), which provides that “in cases in which an obligor is an hourly wage earner and has worked less than forty-five hours per week at the time of the establishment of the support order, any additional income earned from working more than forty-five hours per week shall not be considered income for purposes of such guidelines." The commission determined that the inconsistency of the guidelines with this legislation caused confusion, and made the guidelines more difficult to administer. The commission accordingly reduced to 45 hours the limitation on wages to be considered as gross income. In conjunction with this change, the commission also adopted a new deviation criterion (discussed more fully in the deviation criteria subsection of this preamble) to address those cases in which application of the lower hourly wage limit might result in an inappropriate or inequitable order, in view of a parent’s earnings history and prospects.

(ii) Additional gross income inclusions

The commission added the following items as gross income inclusions to reflect more fully its intent to provide as comprehensive a list as possible of the types of income that should typically be considered. The commission notes, however, that unlisted items are not thereby excluded from gross income unless they are listed as exclusions in the regulation. The additional items are:

* tribal stipends and incentives, and

* adoption subsidy benefits received by the custodial parent for the child whose support is being determined.

(iii)Clarifications

The commission made some language changes to clarify two of the gross income inclusions, as follows:

* The social security benefits inclusion now specifically excludes Supplemental Security Income for a parent or a child.

* The education grant inclusion now is limited specifically to the extent taxable as income under the Internal Revenue Code.

(B) Exclusions

The commission added one item to the gross income exclusions. Supplemental Security Income payments received on behalf of a child living in the home of the parent whose income is being determined now are specifically excluded from gross income.

(C) Other items

Except as noted elsewhere in the discussion of gross income, the present commission expressly endorses the income provisions adopted by the 1999 commission. In particular, and without limitation, it continues the inclusion of:

* social security dependency benefits for a child on the earnings record of an insured parent; and

* gifts, prizes, and lottery and gambling winnings. The commission also specifically continues the exclusion from gross income of the income and regularly recurring contributions or gifts of a spouse or domestic partner, recognizing that the existing deviation criterion for such contributions or gifts remains adequate to address cases in which the existence of such resources justifies a deviation from presumptive support amounts.

(2) Allowable deductions

(A) In general

The commission continues to regard the combined net income of both parents as the fairest measure on which to base the child support obligation. Since the deductions used to calculate net income are limited to those specifically enumerated in the regulation, the commission was careful to consider all potential deductions with a view toward enhancing equity for the parents while protecting the income base available for the support of children. As a result of this review, the commission retained many allowable deductions unchanged from the 1999 guidelines, added three, and limited or expanded two others. A summary and explanation of the commission’s actions concerning allowable deductions follows.

(B) Taxes

The commission continues unchanged in these regulations the allowable deductions for income, social security and medicare taxes.

(C) Health insurance premiums

The 1999 guidelines allowed parents to deduct health insurance premiums for themselves and their legal dependents, but not for the child whose support is being determined. The child’s portion was not deducted because the child’s portion of the health insurance premium was added to the basic obligation and apportioned between the parents in proportion to their respective net incomes.

The commission determined that this method of handling a child’s health insurance costs, while reasonable, unduly complicated the child support determination. First, it required a determination of the portion of a parent’s total health insurance premium attributable to the child. This determination was not always straightforward, as health insurance plans rarely identify amounts attributable to individual family

– xi –

members beyond the primary subscriber. Second, it required a complex adjustment to the basic support obligation, which was not self-evident and frequently led to confusion and uncertainty on the part of parents and practitioners alike. In an effort to simplify application of the guidelines by parents and practitioners, and to make them more understandable to less frequent users, the commission determined that a return to the approach followed in Connecticut’s pre-1994 guidelines was warranted. Under this approach, the cost of the child’s portion of any health insurance premiums paid by a parent are no longer added to the basic obligation and apportioned between the parents. Instead, both parents are allowed to deduct from their gross income the full amount of any health insurance premiums paid by them for themselves and all of their legal dependents, including the child whose support is being determined. The commission also expanded the deduction to include Husky Plan contributions.

(D) Additional allowable deductions

The commission added the following allowable deductions in the interests of equity, in recognition that the amounts deducted are not subject to the parent’s discretion and consequently are not available for the payment of support. The additional deductions are:

* court-ordered life insurance for the benefit of the child whose support is being determined,

* court-ordered disability insurance, and

* the cost of mandatory uniforms and tools, to the extent deducted by the employer.

(E) Union dues

The commission limited the existing deduction for union dues and fees to amounts actually deducted by the employer.

(F) Other alimony and child support awards

The commission has retained the allowable deduction for court-ordered alimony and child support awards unchanged from the 1999 guidelines. In particular, it continues the policy of limiting the deduction to the extent of payment on non-arrearage amounts. The disallowance of arrearage payments as a deduction helps to ensure that a child who is the subject of a subsequent support order is not deprived of an appropriate level of support due to a parent’s non-payment of a prior support order.

The commission recognizes that limiting this deduction to actual payments can be interpreted as a failure to give full effect to an existing court order. Such interpretation relies on at least two principles: one, that a valid court order should be presumed to be paid as ordered in deference to judicial authority; and two, that unpaid orders remain subject to enforcement and future collection. The commission finds that the interest of the child in receiving an appropriate level of support based on the actual disposable income of the parents outweighs these concerns. This determination rests on the commission’s reluctance to reward a parent who neglects to pay a pre-existing child support obligation with a reduced obligation for the child whose support order is now being established. That being said, however, the commission specifically intends that the downward modification remedy be available in appropriate circumstances, subject to applicable state law, to obligors who are faced with an inflated order because they failed to make payments on another pre-existing order.

Finally, the commission considered fully but rejected amendment of this deduction to include alimony amounts payable to the other parent involved in the support determination and to limit the deduction only to ordered child support amounts that are consistent with the guidelines, where the actual order differs from such amount because the parties to a pre-existing order stipulated to an amount higher than that prescribed by the guidelines.

(G) Imputed obligation for qualified child

The commission continues unchanged from the 1999 guidelines the deduction from gross income in the amount of an imputed support obligation for a qualified child. A qualified child is defined as one other than the subject of the support determination, who resides with the parent, is dependent on the parent for support, and for whom the parent has not claimed a deduction for court-ordered support payments. A parent may claim the deduction in the context of an initial support determination or when defending against a proposed modification. A parent cannot claim the deduction when seeking a modification of an existing child support award.

(i) Arrearage guidelines

Section 46b-215a of the Connecticut General Statutes requires the development of guidelines for orders of payment on arrearages. Such guidelines are to be based on the obligor’s ability to pay. The commission interprets the statute to apply only to the determination of periodic payments, and so does not address in the regulations the determination of lump sum payments, which determination remains subject to the discretion of the judge or family support magistrate. The commission found that there was uncertainty in the legal community regarding the applicability of the deviation criteria to the determination of periodic payments on arrearages, and therefore added language at the beginning of the section to clarify that the deviation criteria are intended to apply to such determinations. This subsection of the preamble explains the commission’s rationale for several aspects of the arrearage guidelines.

(1) Simplicity

The commission believes that the arrearage guidelines should be fairly simple to understand and apply, and accordingly continues to base the arrearage payment on a percentage of the current support order.

(2) Percentage of current support

The commission determined that twenty percent (20%) of the current support order continues to be a reasonable percentage to apply toward the reduction of

– xii –

accumulated child support arrearages in most cases. It has accordingly retained this percentage as the general rule, subject to the limitation described in subdivision (4) in this subsection of the preamble.

(3) Arrearage payment when there is no current support order

When there is no current support order, a current support obligation is imputed for the child for whom the arrearage is owed, and the arrearage payment is established as a percentage of that imputed obligation. The applicable percentage is:

(A) twenty percent if the child for whom the arrearage is owed is an unemancipated minor, and

(B) fifty percent if the child for whom the arrearage is owed is deceased, emancipated, or over age eighteen. The twenty percent amount was selected to be consistent with the general rule on the grounds that in the absence of a current support order, the obligor is either supporting the child or would be obligated to do so under state law. The fifty percent amount was selected because in the situations described, the obligor’s current support obligation will have ceased, so that the ability to repay an arrearage is enhanced.

(4) Limitation on amount of arrearage payment

Basing the arrearage payment on the current support order automatically introduces a test of the obligor’s ability to pay. Nonetheless, the commission recognizes that further protection is required to assist obligors in meeting their own self-support needs. It has accordingly retained in these regulations the provision whereby no more than 55% of an obligor’s net income may be taken for the total of all current support and arrearage payments.

(5) Special rule for low-income obligors

The arrearage guidelines provide for a weekly arrearage payment for low-income obligors equal to the greater of ten percent (10%) of the weekly current support order, or one dollar ($1) per week. The lower percentage than that of the general rule is intended to assist such obligors in meeting their own self-support needs while at the same time conveying the important message of the primacy of child support obligations.

(6) Arrearages owed to the state and a custodial parent

The commission has retained the provision for a single arrearage payment order under which payments are to be distributed in accordance with federal requirements. As under the 1999 guidelines, the order is to be payable to the custodial parent until such parent’s arrearage is satisfied, and then to the state.

(7) Special treatment for obligor living with child

The authorizing statute calls for special consideration where the obligor lives with the child when the arrearage order is entered. Accordingly, the commission continues the requirement for only a minimal weekly payment of one dollar ($1) where such obligor’s gross income does not exceed 250% of the poverty guideline for the obligor’s household size. Where the obligor’s income exceeds this amount, the guidelines require a payment of 20% of the imputed support obligation.

(j) Deviation criteria

(1) In general

The commission determined that the deviation criteria are generally working well, and that minimal changes to the regulation were needed. It also found, however, that some clarification was required, and that the addition of three new criteria was warranted. The commission recognizes that keeping the deviation criteria to a minimum serves the stated guidelines purpose of ensuring consistency and promoting settlements. It also finds, however, that due regard to the best interests of the child, as well as fairness to the parents, requires a description of the specific circumstances in which the presumptive support amounts may be inappropriate or unjust. The commission considered case data reported from the automated system maintained by the state’s Title IV-D child support agency in arriving at the regulatory amendments.

(2) Applicability

The commission added language in the introduction and throughout the section to clarify its intent to restrict the application of the deviation criteria to the specific circumstances stated in the lettered subparagraphs listed under the six category headings. For example, under the second heading “extraordinary expenses for care and maintenance of the child," education expenses, unreimbursable medical expenses, and expenses for special needs are listed as the criteria for deviation. Under the revised regulations, these three listed criteria, and no others, may warrant deviation under the category “extraordinary expenses for care and maintenance of the child." There may be other extraordinary expenses for care and maintenance of the child, but unless such expenses can be characterized fairly as falling under one of the three specific listed criteria, they should not be found to warrant a deviation from presumptive support amounts.

Similarly, while acknowledging that agreements of the parties to a child support determination should carry some weight in setting appropriate support amounts, the commission included language in the section introduction that is intended to ensure that the best interests of the child and an adherence to guidelines principles is embodied in such agreements. The new language permits agreements to set support amounts that deviate from the presumptive amounts, but requires that such agreements cite specific deviation criteria and factual bases to justify any variance.

Finally, as noted in the discussion of the arrearage guidelines, the commission added language at the beginning of that section of the regulations to clarify that the deviation criteria are intended to apply to the

– xiii –

determination of periodic payments on child support arrearages.

(3) New criteria

(A) Weekly wages between 45 and 52 hours

This new criterion is associated with the commission’s reduction of the limit on hourly wages to be included in gross income from 52 hours, as existed in the 1999 guidelines, to 45 hours. The commission changed the hourly wage standard to be consistent with section 46b-215d of the general statutes, which the Connecticut legislature enacted subsequent to the completion of the 1999 commission’s activities. The commission intends this new criterion to be available for those cases in which application of the new hourly wage limit would result in an inappropriate or inequitable order, in view of a parent’s earnings history and prospects. The deviation only applies when it is in the best interests of the child, and it cannot be used in a modification context if the obligor worked 45 hours or less when the order was set.

(B) Child care expenses for a qualified child

The commission added a deviation criterion for the child care expenses of a qualified child to address the concern that the required child care contribution, as a component of the child support award in addition to current support, might unduly impact a parent’s ability to pay child care for other children living with such parent. The deviation can be used only to reduce the presumptive child care contribution, not current support, and it applies only if such other children satisfy the definition of “qualified child." The commission also limited the deviation to cases in which an initial child support award is being set or a parent is defending against a proposed modification of an existing child care contribution, to be consistent with the qualified child deduction.

(C) Extraordinary disparity in parental income

This new criterion is associated with the elimination of the white italics from the darker shaded area of the schedule. The white italics in the 1999 guidelines had indicated those income levels at which the diminished basic obligation of a low-income obligor might be reduced even more by consideration of the custodial parent’s income. The commission removed the white italics to simplify the guidelines, in view of the small number of cases in which the custodial parent’s income was high enough to make a difference in the amount of the low-income obligor’s basic obligation. The new criterion is intended to provide a vehicle for addressing the small number of cases affected by this change. The commission also recognizes that there may be other circumstances in which application of the criterion may be warranted.

(4) Shared physical custody

The commission considered at length the deviation for shared physical custody, and concluded that it should remain unchanged from the 1999 guidelines. In accordance with the amended definition, a finding of shared physical custody should be made only where each parent exercises physical care and control of the child for periods substantially in excess of a normal visitation schedule. The commission deems a normal visitation schedule typically to consist of two overnights on alternate weekends; alternate holidays; some vacation time; and other visits of short duration, which may occasion an overnight stay during the week. While periods in excess of a normal visitation schedule are required for a finding of shared physical custody, the commission emphasizes that an equal time-sharing is not required for such finding. Courts and other officials still must determine what precise level of sharing is sufficient to warrant a deviation from presumptive support amounts. The commission continues to reject a “brightline" definitional test as well as a formula approach to shared custody situations to discourage disputes over time-sharing as a means of affecting support amounts. The commission believes the approach continued in these regulations leaves sufficient room for the exercise of judicial discretion while providing a measure of predictability for the parties.

(5) Additional considerations

The commission reviewed all of the other existing deviation criteria and determined that no substantive amendments are warranted at this time. The commission notes, however, that the deviation criterion for a parent’s earning capacity must now be read in conjunction with subsection (b) of section 46b-215b of the Connecticut General Statutes, which prohibits application of such criterion in certain cases when the parent qualifies for disability benefits.

(k) The guidelines commission and review process

(1) Statutory authority and membership

The Commission for Child Support Guidelines is established under section 46b-215a of the Connecticut General Statutes. The commission is charged with establishing guidelines to ensure the appropriateness of child support awards, and for reviewing and updating such guidelines every four years. The commission consists of eleven members. The Chief Court Administrator, the Commissioner of Social Services, the Attorney General, and the chairpersons and ranking members of the joint standing committee on judiciary all serve in their official capacities, and may select designees to serve in their place. The Governor appoints a representative of the Connecticut Bar Association, a representative of legal services, a person who represents the financial concerns of child support obligors, and a representative of the Permanent Commission on the Status of Women. The commission elects its own chairperson who was, during the most recent review process, Patricia A. Wilson-Coker, JD, MSW, Commissioner of Social Services. In addition to the voting membership, other representatives of various agencies and court systems involved in the child support determination process participated regularly in commission meetings, and staffed the work of the commission. The commission

– xiv –

gratefully acknowledges the contributions of these individuals to the work of the commission.

(2) Review process

The commission held biweekly meetings, which were open to the public, beginning October 2002. The commission filed a schedule of meetings with the Secretary of the State, as required by statute, and kept detailed minutes of each meeting. Early in its review process, the commission reached out in several directions in an effort to gather maximum input on possible changes to the guidelines.

The commission held focus groups of staff from the Bureau of Child Support Enforcement of the Department of Social Services, Support Enforcement Services of the Court Operations Division of the Judicial Branch, and Assistant Attorneys General in the Child Support Department of the Office of the Attorney General who offered their valuable insights on the areas in which the existing guidelines were working well, and those in which improvement seemed warranted. The commission then invited staff representatives of these agencies to address the commission and summarize the concerns of these focus groups.

The commission invited representatives of Fatherhood Initiative sites throughout the state, as well as a representative of the Connecticut Women’s Education and Legal Fund, to address the commission to present their concerns regarding the impact of the existing guidelines on the clients they serve. The Connecticut Bar Association representative on the commission surveyed selected family law attorneys, and compiled a synopsis of their responses to various questions on identified guidelines issues, which was made available to the commission.

The commission scheduled six public hearings to receive comments from the public on how the guidelines affected them, and to offer the opportunity to recommend changes. All of the public hearings were scheduled for the month of January 2003 – five during the evening, and one in the afternoon. Notice of the hearings was published in the Connecticut Law Journal; a flyer was posted in many locations; and the hearings were publicized widely in newspapers throughout the state. Unfortunately, one of the hearings was cancelled due to a power outage, and one was not held because no one attended. In all, however, the commission received comments from 39 individuals either at the public hearings or in written correspondence following the hearings.

Somewhat later in its deliberations, after the commission had identified some of the major areas for increased scrutiny of potential regulatory revision, the commission welcomed the Chief Family Administrative Judge of the Connecticut Superior Court to present and discuss with the commission his views on selected issues related to the guidelines and their implementation in the court system.

The commission also hired a nationally recognized leader in the field of child support guidelines consulting, Policy Studies, Inc., to prepare a new Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations based on updated economic research, and to modify the schedule in accordance with certain commission determinations, as described in earlier sections of this preamble.

Finally, in addition to the outreach methods described above, the commission during its deliberations employed several more research and data-gathering techniques, including but not limited to: examination of the statistical records of the computerized Connecticut Child Support Enforcement System relating to the application of the guidelines to ensure that deviations from the guidelines are limited; survey of other states’ child support agencies to determine other possible approaches to various guidelines issues; internet research on specific guidelines-related topics; review of appellate court decisions from Connecticut and other states; consideration of an appellate brief submitted by an interested citizen; reading and summarizing books, articles, and reports of various kinds and media covering particular guidelines issues; and informal consultation with members of the bar, the bench, state legislators, agency representatives, and interested members of the public concerning guidelines issues.

Following the commission’s information gathering, deliberations, and development of revised regulations, including a new schedule and worksheet, the commission submitted the proposed regulatory amendments to the Office of the Attorney General for a review of legal sufficiency, and to the joint standing Legislative Regulation Review Committee for final approval, as required by section 46b-215c of the general statutes.

(l) Effective date

The commission selected an effective date of August 1, 2005 to provide sufficient time for those who are involved in the determination of child support amounts within the state to become familiar with the guidelines prior to their required implementation.

– 1 –

CHILD SUPPORT AND ARREARAGE GUIDELINES REGULATIONS

Section 46b-215a-1. Definitions

As used in sections 46b-215a-1, 46b-215a-2b, 46b-215a-3, 46b-215a-4a and 46b-215a-5b:

(1) “Allowable deductions" means average weekly amounts subtracted from gross income to arrive at net income, and are limited to the following:

(A) federal, state and local income taxes, based upon all allowable exemptions, deductions and credits;

(B) social security taxes or, in lieu thereof, mandatory retirement plan deductions for an amount not to exceed the maximum amount permissible under social security;

(C) medicare tax;

(D) medical, hospital, dental or health insurance premium payments, including Husky Plan contributions, for the parent and his or her legal dependents, provided the parent provides the name of the insurer and the policy number;

(E) court-ordered life insurance for the benefit of the child whose support is being determined;

(F) court-ordered disability insurance;

(G) mandatory union dues or fees, including initiation, to the extent deducted by the employer;

(H) the cost of mandatory uniforms and tools, to the extent deducted by the employer;

(I) court-ordered alimony and child support awards for individuals not involved in the support determination, provided a deduction for such awards shall be allowed only to the extent of payment on any non-arrearage amounts; and

(J) an imputed support obligation for a qualified child, as determined in accordance with section 46b-215a-2b(e) of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies.

(2) “Arrearage" is synonymous with “past-due support" and means any one or a combination of the following:

(A) court ordered current support or arrearage payments which have become due and payable and remain unpaid;

(B) unpaid child support award amounts which have been reduced to a judgment or otherwise found to be due by a court of competent jurisdiction, whether or not presently payable; and

(C) support due for periods prior to an action to establish a child support order.

(3) “Child" means an individual whose parents have a duty to provide support, and includes “children" where the context so requires.

(4) “Child care costs" means amounts expended for the care and supervision of a child whose support is being determined.

(5) “Child support and arrearage guidelines" means the rules, principles, schedule and worksheet established under sections 46b-215a-1, 46b-215a-2b, 46b-215a-3, 46b-215a-4a and 46b-215a-5b of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies for the determination of an appropriate child support award, to be used when initially establishing or modifying both temporary and permanent orders.

(6) “Child support award" means the entire payment obligation of the noncustodial parent, as determined under the child support and arrearage guidelines, and includes current support payments, health care coverage, child care contribution and periodic payments on arrearages.

– 2 –

(7) “Current support" means an amount for the ongoing support of a child, exclusive of arrearage payments, health care coverage and a child care contribution.

(8) “Custodial parent" means the parent who provides the child’s primary residence.

(9) “Dependent" means a spouse or child for whom a parent is legally responsible under state law.

(10) “Deviation criteria" means those facts or circumstances specified in section 46b-215a-3 of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, which may justify an order different from the presumptive support amounts.

(11) “Gross income" means the average weekly earned and unearned income from all sources before deductions, including but not limited to the items listed in subparagraph (A) of this subdivision, but excluding the items listed in subparagraph (B) of this subdivision.

(A) Inclusions

The gross income inclusions are:

(i) salary;

(ii) hourly wages for regular, overtime and additional employment not to exceed 45 total paid hours per week;

(iii) commissions, bonuses and tips;

(iv) profit sharing, deferred compensation and severance pay;

(v) tribal stipends and incentives;

(vi) employment perquisites and in-kind compensation (any basic maintenance or special need such as food, shelter or transportation provided on a recurrent basis in lieu of or in addition to salary or wages);

(vii) military personnel fringe benefit payments;

(viii) benefits received in place of earned income including, but not limited to, workers’ compensation benefits, unemployment insurance benefits, strike pay and disability insurance benefits;

(ix) veterans’ benefits;

(x) social security benefits (excluding Supplemental Security Income (SSI) for a parent or a child), including dependency benefits on the earnings record of an insured parent that are paid on behalf of a child whose support is being determined;

(xi) net proceeds from contractual agreements;

(xii) pension and retirement income;

(xiii) rental income after deduction of reasonable and necessary expenses;

(xiv) estate or trust income;

(xv) royalties;

(xvi) interest, dividends and annuities;

(xvii) self-employment earnings, after deduction of all reasonable and necessary business expenses;

– 3 –

(xviii) alimony being paid by an individual who is not a party to the support determination;

(xix) adoption subsidy benefits received by the custodial parent for the child whose support is being determined;

(xx) lottery and gambling winnings, prizes and regularly recurring gifts (except as provided in subparagraph (B)(v) of this subdivision); and

(xxi) education grants (including fellowships or subsidies, to the extent taxable as income under the Internal Revenue Code).

(B) Exclusions

The gross income exclusions are:

(i) support received on behalf of a child who is living in the home of the parent whose income is being determined;

(ii) SSI payments, including those received on behalf of a child who is living in the home of the parent whose income is being determined;

(iii) federal, state and local public assistance grants;

(iv) earned income tax credit; and

(v) the income and regularly recurring contributions or gifts of a spouse or domestic partner.

(12) “Health care coverage" means any provision of the child support award that addresses the child’s medical or dental needs, and includes an order for either parent to:

(A) provide medical or dental insurance for such child, or

(B) pay all or a part of such child’s medical and dental expenses that are not covered by insurance or reimbursed in any other manner.

(13) “Husky Plan" means the plan to provide health care for uninsured children established under sections 17b-289 to 17b-303, inclusive, of the Connecticut General Statutes and section 16 of Public Act 97-1 of the October 29 Special Session, and includes:

(A) the Husky Plan, Part A (also known as Medicaid) for children receiving assistance under section 17b-261 of the Connecticut General Statutes; and

(B) the Husky Plan, Part B for children receiving assistance under sections 17b-289 to 17b-303,

inclusive, of the Connecticut General Statutes and section 16 of Public Act 97-1 of the October 29 Special Session.

(14) “Imputed support obligation" means a theoretical current support obligation computed for given children in accordance with section 46b-215a-2b of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, the amount of which obligation is used to determine the allowable deduction for a qualified child under subsection (e) of said section and to calculate arrearage payments under section 46b-215a-4a of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies.

(15) “Low-income obligor" means an obligor whose basic child support obligation is determined without considering the other parent’s income, using the darker shaded area of the schedule.

(16) “Net disposable income" means:

(A) with reference to the custodial parent, except as provided in subparagraph (C) of this subdivision, the custodial parent’s net income increased by the sum of:

– 4 –

(i) the recommended current support order,

(ii) eighty percent of the weekly amount of any alimony paid by the noncustodial parent to the custodial parent, and

(iii) the amount of any social security dependency benefits on the earnings record of the noncustodial parent that are paid on behalf of the child whose support is being determined; and

(B) with reference to the noncustodial parent, except as provided in subparagraph (C) of this subdivision, the noncustodial parent’s net income reduced by the sum of:

(i) the recommended current support order,

(ii) eighty percent of the weekly amount of any alimony paid by the noncustodial parent to the custodial parent, and

(iii) the amount of any social security dependency benefits on the earnings record of the noncustodial parent that are paid on behalf of the child whose support is being determined.

(C) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (A) and (B) of this subdivision, if the custodial parent pays alimony to the noncustodial parent, eighty percent of the weekly amount of such alimony is:

(i) subtracted from the custodial parent’s net income to calculate the custodial parent’s net disposable income, and

(ii) added to the noncustodial parent’s net income to calculate the noncustodial parent’s net disposable income.

(17) “Net income" means gross income minus allowable deductions.

(18) “Noncustodial parent" means a parent who does not provide the child’s primary residence.

(19) “Obligor" means a parent who is ordered to make payments under a child support award.

(20) “Presumptive support amounts" means the child support award components calculated under sections 46b-215a-2b and 46b-215a-4a of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, prior to consideration of the deviation criteria specified in section 46b-215a-3 of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies.

(21) “Schedule" means the Connecticut Child Support Guidelines Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations included in section 46b-215a-2b of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies.

(22) “Shared physical custody" means a situation in which each parent exercises physical care and control of the child for periods substantially in excess of a normal visitation schedule. An equal sharing of physical care and control of the child is not required for a finding of shared physical custody.

(23) “Split custody" means a situation in which there is more than one child in common and each parent is the custodial parent of at least one of the children.

(24) “Title IV-D" means the provisions of the federal Social Security Act, which require states to implement a child support enforcement program.

(25) “Worksheet" means form CCSG-1, Worksheet for the Connecticut Child Support and Arrearage Guidelines, which is intended for use with all applicable instructions in sections 46b-215a-2b and 46b-215a-4a of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies. The worksheet is included in section 46b-215a-5b of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies.

– 5 –

Section 46b-215a-2b. Child support guidelines

(a) Applicability

(1) Award components

This section shall be used to determine the current support, health care coverage and child care contribution components of all child support awards within the state, subject to section 46b-215a-3 of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies.

(2) Income scope

When the parents’ combined net weekly income exceeds $4,000, child support awards shall be determined on a case-by-case basis, and the current support prescribed at the $4,000 net weekly income level shall be the minimum presumptive amount.

(b) Using the worksheet

The line references throughout this section are to the worksheet set forth in section 46b-215a-5b of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies. Use one worksheet in most cases. When there is a third party custodian and either parent is a low-income obligor (as determined in subsection (c)(3)(A) of this section), complete a separate worksheet for each parent. Enter on the worksheet only weekly amounts, which may be rounded to the nearest dollar.

(c) Determining the amount of current support

The procedures in this subsection shall be used, subject to subsections (d) and (e) of this section, to determine the current support component of the child support award.

(1) Order requirements

(A) Specific dollar amount

The current support order shall include a specific dollar amount of support as a primary element, to be payable on a recurring basis.

(B) Indeterminate amounts

The primary requirement of a specific dollar amount of current support shall not preclude the entry of a supplemental order, in appropriate cases, to pay a percentage of a future lump sum payment, such as a bonus. Such supplemental orders may be entered only when:

(i) such payment is of an indeterminate amount; and

(ii) the percentage is generally consistent with the schedule in subsection (f) of this section.

(2) Determine the net weekly income of each parent

Follow the instructions in this subdivision to determine the net weekly income of each parent.

(A) Enter the parent’s gross income on line 1, and indicate the number of work hours, to a maximum of forty-five, used to determine the gross income.

– 6 –

(B) Enter the parent’s federal income tax, based on all allowable exemptions, deductions and credits, on line 2.

(C) Enter the parent’s social security tax or, in lieu thereof, mandatory retirement plan deduction, not to exceed the maximum amount permissible under social security, on line 3.

(D) Enter the parent’s medicare tax on line 4.

(E) Enter the parent’s state and local income tax, based on all allowable exemptions, deductions and credits, on line 5.

(F) Enter the parent’s medical, hospital, dental or health insurance premium payments, including any Husky Plan contributions, for the parent and his or her legal dependents, including the child whose support is being determined, on line 6.

(G) Enter the parent’s payments on court-ordered life insurance for the benefit of the child whose support is being determined on line 7.

(H) Enter the parent’s payments on court-ordered disability insurance on line 8.

(I) Enter the parent’s mandatory union dues or fees, including initiation, to the extent deducted by the employer, on line 9.

(J) Enter the parent’s cost of mandatory uniforms and tools, to the extent deducted by the employer, on line 10.

(K) Enter the amount of the parent’s court-ordered alimony and child support payments for individuals not involved in the support determination on line 11. Do not include arrearage payments in this amount.

(L) If the parent is entitled to a qualified child deduction in accordance with subsection (e) of this section, compute an imputed support obligation for the parent’s qualified child, following the procedures in subdivision (2) of such subsection, and enter the amount on line 12.

(M) Add the amounts entered on lines 2-12 for each parent and enter the sum on line 13 for each parent.

(N) Subtract each parent’s line 13 amount from the parent’s line 1 amount and enter the result on line 14 for each parent. The line 14 amount for each parent is that parent’s net weekly income.

(3) Determine the basic child support obligation

Follow the instructions below in the order presented to determine the basic child support obligation using the Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations found in subsection (f) of this section.

(A) Find the block in the schedule that corresponds to the income level of the noncustodial parent (rounded to the nearest ten dollars) and the number of children whose support is being determined.

(i) If this block is in the darker shaded area of the schedule, the noncustodial parent is a lowincome obligor. The dollar amount shown in the block is the noncustodial parent’s basic child support obligation. Enter this amount on line 16 and proceed to subdivision (4) of this subsection.

– 7 –

(ii) If this block is not in the darker shaded area of the schedule, the noncustodial parent is not a low-income obligor. Proceed to subparagraph (B) of this subdivision to determine the basic child support obligation.

(B) Add the line 14 amounts for each parent. The result is the combined net weekly income. Round this amount to the nearest ten dollars and enter on line 15. Find the block in the schedule that corresponds to the line 15 amount and the number of children whose support is being determined.

The dollar amount shown in this block is the basic child support obligation of both parents for the support of all children. Enter this amount on line 16 and proceed to subdivision (4) of this subsection.

(4) Determine each parent’s share of the basic child support obligation

Except as provided in subparagraph (A) of this subdivision, each parent’s share of the basic child support obligation is determined by calculating each parent’s share of the combined net weekly income, as entered on line 15, and multiplying the result for each parent by the basic child support obligation.

(A) In the case of a low-income obligor, skip line 17, enter the line 16 amount in the noncustodial parent’s column on line 18 and proceed to subdivision (5) of this subsection.

(B) Determine each parent’s percentage share of the combined net weekly income by dividing the line 14 amount for each parent by the line 15 amount and multiplying by one hundred percent. Enter the result (rounded to the nearest whole percentage) for each parent on line 17.

(C) Multiply the line 17 amount for each parent by the line 16 amount. Enter the result for each parent on line 18. These amounts are each parent’s share of the basic child support obligation.

(5) Adjust for social security benefits

Enter on line 19 in the noncustodial parent’s column the weekly amount of any social security dependency benefits on the earnings record of such parent that are paid on behalf of the child whose support is being determined.

(6) Determine the presumptive current support amount

The presumptive current support amount for each parent is equal to that parent’s share of the basic child support obligation, except where there is an adjustment for social security dependency benefits in accordance with subdivision (5) of this subsection.

(A) If there is no entry on line 19 in the noncustodial parent’s column, enter each parent’s line 18 amount, rounded to the nearest dollar, on line 20 in the appropriate column. Also enter the noncustodial parent’s line 20 amount in the appropriate space on line 34.

(B) If there is an entry on line 19 in the noncustodial parent’s column, subtract the line 19 amount from the noncustodial parent’s line 18 amount and enter the result, rounded to the nearest dollar, on line 20 in the noncustodial parent’s column and in the appropriate space on line 34. Then enter the custodial parent’s line 18 amount, rounded to the nearest dollar, on line 20 in the custodial parent’s column.

– 8 –

(7) Determine the recommended current support order

The recommended current support order shall equal the presumptive current support amount for the noncustodial parent unless a deviation criterion, as specified in section 46b-215a-3 of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, applies.

(A) If a deviation criterion applies, complete section VII of the worksheet, checking all boxes that apply, and attach an additional sheet if necessary to explain the deviation. Enter the recommended weekly current support order on line 34.

(B) The line 20 amount for the custodial parent is retained by the custodial parent and is presumed spent on the children. The presumptive support amount for the custodial parent is not established as an order and is not entered on line 34.

(d) Determining the amount of current support in split custody situations

In a split custody situation, as defined in section 46b-215a-1(23) of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, a single support obligation is calculated by offsetting theoretical presumptive current support amounts for each parent as follows.

(1) Determine the presumptive current support amount that the father would owe to the mother for the children in her custody as if those children were the only children of the parties, following all applicable procedures in subsection (c) of this section.

(2) Determine the presumptive current support amount that the mother would owe to the father for the children in his custody as if those children were the only children of the parties, following all applicable procedures in subsection (c) of this section.

(3) Subtract the lesser amount from the greater, as determined in subdivisions (1) and (2) of this subsection.

(4) The recommended current support order shall equal the amount calculated in subdivision (3) of this subsection unless a deviation criterion, as specified in section 46b-215a-3 of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, applies. Such order shall be payable by the parent whose presumptive current support amount, as determined in subdivisions (1) and (2) of this subsection, is greater. If a deviation criterion applies, complete section VII of the worksheet, checking all boxes that apply, and attach an additional sheet if necessary to explain the deviation. Enter the recommended weekly current support order on line 34.

(e) Determining the amount of current support when another child resides with a parent

(1) Applicability

This subsection shall be used to determine the amount of current support only under the circumstances described in subparagraphs (A) and (B) of this subdivision.

(A) Qualified child

Either parent claims a qualified child. A qualified child is one:

(i) who is currently living in the same household with the parent, if such parent is the child’s legal guardian, or, if such parent is not the child’s legal guardian, has lived in the same

– 9 –

household with such parent for at least the six months immediately preceding the support determination or six of the twelve months immediately preceding such determination;

(ii) who is a dependent of the parent;

(iii) who is not a subject of the support determination; and

(iv) for whom the parent has not claimed a deduction under section 46b-215a-1(1)(I) of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies.

(B) Initial award or defense to modification

An initial child support award is being established, or a parent is defending against a proposed modification of an existing child support award.

(2) Procedure

When this subsection applies, determine the amount of current support by following the procedures in this subdivision.

(A) Determine current support amount for all children

(i) Enter on line 12a for the parent claiming a qualified child the sum of lines 2-11 for such parent.

(ii) Subtract the parent’s line 12a amount from the parent’s line 1 amount and enter the result on line 12b for such parent.

(iii) Refer to the schedule to determine a single theoretical presumptive current support amount for the number of children consisting of the child whose support is being determined and the qualified child. For the purpose of this determination, deem the gross income of the other parent of each such child to be zero. Enter the schedule amount on line 12c for the claiming parent.

(B) Determine imputed support obligation for qualified child

Divide the amount entered on line 12c by the number of children used in determining such amount, and enter the result on line 12d for the claiming parent. Multiply the amount entered on line 12d by the number of the claiming parent’s qualified children, and enter the product on line 12 for the claiming parent. The line 12 amount is the imputed support obligation for the qualified child.

(C) Determine current support for subject child

Continue following the remaining procedures in subsection (c) of this section to determine the amount of current support for the subject child, using the imputed support obligation for the qualified child as a deduction from the gross income of the claiming parent.

(f) Schedule of basic child support obligations

Following is the schedule to be used for determining the basic child support obligation in accordance with subsection (c) of this section. Note that all obligation money amounts have been rounded to the nearest dollar in this schedule.

– 10 –

CONNECTICUT CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES

SCHEDULE OF BASIC CHILD SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS

NOTE: Noncustodial parent income only for the darker shaded areas of the schedule on the first page; combined parental income for the remainder of the schedule.

1 Child 2 Children 3 Children 4 Children 5 Children 6 Children

Combined

Net

Weekly

Income % $ % $ % $ % $ % $ % $

50 10.00% 5 10.40% 5 10.80% 5 11.20% 6 11.60% 6 12.00% 6

60 10.00% 6 10.54% 6 11.08% 7 11.62% 7 12.16% 7 12.70% 8

70 10.00% 7 10.68% 7 11.36% 8 12.04% 8 12.72% 9 13.40% 9

80 10.00% 8 10.82% 9 11.64% 9 12.46% 10 13.28% 11 14.10% 11

90 10.00% 9 10.96% 10 11.92% 11 12.88% 12 13.84% 12 14.80% 13

100 10.00% 10 11.10% 11 12.20% 12 13.30% 13 14.40% 14 15.50% 16

110 10.00% 11 11.24% 12 12.48% 14 13.72% 15 14.96% 16 16.20% 18

120 10.00% 12 11.38% 14 12.76% 15 14.14% 17 15.52% 19 16.90% 20

130 10.00% 13 11.52% 15 13.04% 17 14.56% 19 16.08% 21 17.60% 23

140 10.00% 14 11.66% 16 13.32% 19 14.98% 21 16.64% 23 18.30% 26

150 10.00% 15 11.80% 18 13.60% 20 15.40% 23 17.20% 26 19.00% 29

160 10.00% 16 14.62% 23 16.78% 27 18.70% 30 20.57% 33 22.46% 36

170 12.29% 21 17.10% 29 19.59% 33 21.62% 37 23.55% 40 25.50% 43

180 14.32% 26 19.31% 35 22.08% 40 24.21% 44 26.19% 47 28.21% 51

190 16.14% 31 21.29% 40 24.32% 46 26.53% 50 28.56% 54 30.64% 58

200 17.78% 36 23.07% 46 26.33% 53 28.62% 57 30.69% 61 32.82% 66

210 19.26% 40 24.68% 52 28.14% 59 30.50% 64 32.62% 68 34.80% 73

220 20.61% 45 26.14% 58 29.80% 66 32.22% 71 34.37% 76 36.59% 81

230 21.84% 50 27.48% 63 31.30% 72 33.79% 78 35.97% 83 38.23% 88

240 22.96% 55 28.70% 69 32.69% 78 35.22% 85 37.43% 90 39.73% 95

250 24.00% 60 29.83% 75 33.96% 85 36.54% 91 38.78% 97 41.11% 103

260 25.51% 66 30.87% 80 35.13% 91 37.76% 98 40.03% 104 42.39% 110

270 25.49% 69 31.83% 86 36.22% 98 38.89% 105 41.18% 111 43.57% 118

280 25.48% 71 32.73% 92 37.23% 104 39.94% 112 42.25% 118 44.67% 125

290 25.47% 74 33.56% 97 38.17% 111 40.92% 119 43.25% 125 45.69% 133

300 25.46% 76 35.00% 105 39.05% 117 41.83% 125 44.18% 133 46.64% 140

310 25.45% 79 35.99% 112 39.87% 124 42.68% 132 45.05% 140 47.53% 147

320 25.44% 81 35.98% 115 40.64% 130 43.48% 139 45.86% 147 48.37% 155

330 25.43% 84 35.97% 119 41.67% 137 44.23% 146 46.63% 154 49.16% 162

340 25.41% 86 35.95% 122 41.64% 142 44.94% 153 47.35% 161 49.89% 170

350 25.40% 89 35.91% 126 41.61% 146 45.61% 160 48.03% 168 50.59% 177

360 25.38% 91 35.88% 129 41.57% 150 46.24% 166 48.67% 175 51.25% 185

370 25.37% 94 35.84% 133 41.54% 154 46.32% 171 49.28% 182 51.87% 192

380 25.36% 96 35.81% 136 41.51% 158 46.28% 176 49.86% 189 52.46% 199

390 25.34% 99 35.78% 140 41.48% 162 46.25% 180 50.40% 197 53.02% 207

400 25.33% 101 35.75% 143 41.45% 166 46.22% 185 50.84% 203 53.55% 214

410 25.32% 104 35.72% 146 41.43% 170 46.19% 189 50.81% 208 54.06% 222

420 25.31% 106 35.70% 150 41.40% 174 46.16% 194 50.78% 213 54.54% 229

430 25.30% 109 35.67% 153 41.38% 178 46.13% 198 50.75% 218 55.21% 237

440 25.27% 111 35.62% 157 41.29% 182 46.04% 203 50.65% 223 55.11% 242

450 25.25% 114 35.55% 160 41.20% 185 45.93% 207 50.53% 227 54.97% 247

460 25.22% 116 35.48% 163 41.10% 189 45.83% 211 50.41% 232 54.85% 252

470 25.20% 118 35.42% 166 41.01% 193 45.73% 215 50.30% 236 54.73% 257

480 25.18% 121 35.36% 170 40.92% 196 45.63% 219 50.19% 241 54.61% 262

490 25.16% 123 35.30% 173 40.84% 200 45.54% 223 50.09% 245 54.50% 267

– 11 –

CONNECTICUT CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES

SCHEDULE OF BASIC CHILD SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS

($500 – $990 COMBINED NET WEEKLY INCOME)

1 Child 2 Children 3 Children 4 Children 5 Children 6 Children

Combined

Net

Weekly

Income % $ % $ % $ % $ % $ % $

500 25.14% 126 35.25% 176 40.76% 204 45.45% 227 49.99% 250 54.39% 272

510 25.12% 128 35.19% 179 40.68% 207 45.36% 231 49.90% 254 54.29% 277

520 25.10% 131 35.14% 183 40.61% 211 45.28% 235 49.81% 259 54.19% 282

530 25.07% 133 35.08% 186 40.53% 215 45.19% 239 49.71% 263 54.08% 287

540 25.01% 135 34.97% 189 40.38% 218 45.02% 243 49.52% 267 53.88% 291

550 24.95% 137 34.86% 192 40.23% 221 44.86% 247 49.35% 271 53.69% 295

560 24.89% 139 34.75% 195 40.09% 225 44.71% 250 49.18% 275 53.50% 300

570 24.83% 142 34.65% 198 39.96% 228 44.56% 254 49.01% 279 53.32% 304

580 24.78% 144 34.55% 200 39.83% 231 44.41% 258 48.85% 283 53.15% 308

590 24.72% 146 34.46% 203 39.71% 234 44.27% 261 48.70% 287 52.98% 313

600 24.67% 148 34.36% 206 39.58% 238 44.14% 265 48.55% 291 52.82% 317

610 24.62% 150 34.27% 209 39.47% 241 44.01% 268 48.41% 295 52.67% 321

620 24.57% 152 34.19% 212 39.35% 244 43.88% 272 48.27% 299 52.52% 326

630 24.52% 154 34.10% 215 39.25% 247 43.76% 276 48.13% 303 52.37% 330

640 24.47% 157 34.03% 218 39.14% 250 43.64% 279 48.00% 307 52.23% 334

650 24.42% 159 33.95% 221 39.04% 254 43.53% 283 47.88% 311 52.09% 339

660 24.38% 161 33.87% 224 38.94% 257 43.42% 287 47.76% 315 51.96% 343

670 24.33% 163 33.80% 226 38.84% 260 43.31% 290 47.64% 319 51.83% 347

680 24.29% 165 33.73% 229 38.75% 263 43.20% 294 47.52% 323 51.71% 352

690 24.24% 167 33.66% 232 38.66% 267 43.10% 297 47.41% 327 51.58% 356

700 24.20% 169 33.59% 235 38.57% 270 43.00% 301 47.30% 331 51.47% 360

710 24.16% 172 33.53% 238 38.48% 273 42.91% 305 47.20% 335 51.35% 365

720 24.12% 174 33.47% 241 38.40% 276 42.81% 308 47.10% 339 51.24% 369

730 24.10% 176 33.43% 244 38.35% 280 42.76% 312 47.04% 343 51.18% 374

740 24.08% 178 33.40% 247 38.31% 283 42.71% 316 46.98% 348 51.12% 378

750 24.07% 180 33.37% 250 38.26% 287 42.66% 320 46.93% 352 51.06% 383

760 24.05% 183 33.34% 253 38.22% 290 42.62% 324 46.88% 356 51.00% 388

770 24.03% 185 33.32% 257 38.18% 294 42.57% 328 46.83% 361 50.95% 392

780 24.02% 187 33.29% 260 38.14% 298 42.53% 332 46.78% 365 50.90% 397

790 24.00% 190 33.26% 263 38.10% 301 42.49% 336 46.73% 369 50.85% 402

800 23.99% 192 33.24% 266 38.07% 305 42.44% 340 46.69% 374 50.80% 406

810 23.97% 194 33.21% 269 38.03% 308 42.40% 343 46.64% 378 50.75% 411

820 23.95% 196 33.18% 272 37.98% 311 42.34% 347 46.58% 382 50.68% 416

830 23.93% 199 33.11% 275 37.88% 314 42.23% 351 46.46% 386 50.55% 420

840 23.90% 201 33.04% 278 37.78% 317 42.13% 354 46.34% 389 50.42% 424

850 23.87% 203 32.98% 280 37.69% 320 42.02% 357 46.22% 393 50.29% 427

860 23.84% 205 32.92% 283 37.60% 323 41.92% 361 46.11% 397 50.17% 431

870 23.82% 207 32.86% 286 37.51% 326 41.82% 364 46.00% 400 50.05% 435

880 23.79% 209 32.80% 289 37.42% 329 41.72% 367 45.89% 404 49.93% 439

890 23.77% 212 32.74% 291 37.33% 332 41.63% 370 45.79% 408 49.82% 443

900 23.74% 214 32.68% 294 37.25% 335 41.53% 374 45.69% 411 49.71% 447

910 23.72% 216 32.63% 297 37.17% 338 41.44% 377 45.59% 415 49.60% 451

920 23.65% 218 32.50% 299 37.01% 341 41.27% 380 45.39% 418 49.39% 454

930 23.54% 219 32.34% 301 36.82% 342 41.05% 382 45.16% 420 49.13% 457

940 23.45% 220 32.19% 303 36.63% 344 40.84% 384 44.93% 422 48.88% 459

950 23.35% 222 32.03% 304 36.45% 346 40.64% 386 44.70% 425 48.64% 462

960 23.25% 223 31.89% 306 36.27% 348 40.44% 388 44.48% 427 48.40% 465

970 23.16% 225 31.74% 308 36.09% 350 40.24% 390 44.27% 429 48.16% 467

980 23.07% 226 31.59% 310 35.92% 352 40.05% 392 44.06% 432 47.93% 470

990 22.98% 228 31.45% 311 35.75% 354 39.86% 395 43.85% 434 47.71% 472

– 12 –

CONNECTICUT CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES

SCHEDULE OF BASIC CHILD SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS

($1000 – $1490 COMBINED NET WEEKLY INCOME)

1 Child 2 Children 3 Children 4 Children 5 Children 6 Children

Combined

Net

Weekly

Income % $ % $ % $ % $ % $ % $

1000 22.89% 229 31.32% 313 35.59% 356 39.68% 397 43.65% 436 47.49% 475

1010 22.81% 230 31.18% 315 35.42% 358 39.50% 399 43.45% 439 47.27% 477

1020 22.73% 232 31.05% 317 35.26% 360 39.32% 401 43.25% 441 47.06% 480

1030 22.64% 233 30.92% 318 35.11% 362 39.14% 403 43.06% 444 46.85% 483

1040 22.56% 235 30.79% 320 34.95% 364 38.97% 405 42.87% 446 46.64% 485

1050 22.48% 236 30.67% 322 34.80% 365 38.81% 407 42.69% 448 46.44% 488

1060 22.40% 237 30.53% 324 34.64% 367 38.62% 409 42.48% 450 46.22% 490

1070 22.28% 238 30.35% 325 34.41% 368 38.37% 411 42.21% 452 45.92% 491

1080 22.16% 239 30.17% 326 34.19% 369 38.12% 412 41.94% 453 45.63% 493

1090 22.04% 240 29.99% 327 33.97% 370 37.88% 413 41.67% 454 45.34% 494

1100 21.93% 241 29.82% 328 33.76% 371 37.64% 414 41.41% 455 45.05% 496

1110 21.82% 242 29.65% 329 33.55% 372 37.41% 415 41.15% 457 44.77% 497

1120 21.71% 243 29.48% 330 33.35% 373 37.18% 416 40.90% 458 44.50% 498

1130 21.60% 244 29.32% 331 33.14% 375 36.96% 418 40.65% 459 44.23% 500

1140 21.49% 245 29.16% 332 32.95% 376 36.73% 419 40.41% 461 43.96% 501

1150 21.39% 246 29.00% 334 32.75% 377 36.52% 420 40.17% 462 43.70% 503

1160 21.29% 247 28.85% 335 32.56% 378 36.30% 421 39.93% 463 43.45% 504

1170 21.19% 248 28.70% 336 32.37% 379 36.09% 422 39.70% 465 43.20% 505

1180 21.09% 249 28.55% 337 32.18% 380 35.89% 423 39.47% 466 42.95% 507

1190 20.99% 250 28.40% 338 32.00% 381 35.68% 425 39.25% 467 42.71% 508

1200 20.90% 251 28.25% 339 31.82% 382 35.48% 426 39.03% 468 42.47% 510

1210 20.80% 252 28.11% 340 31.65% 383 35.29% 427 38.82% 470 42.23% 511

1220 20.71% 253 27.97% 341 31.47% 384 35.09% 428 38.60% 471 42.00% 512

1230 20.62% 254 27.83% 342 31.30% 385 34.90% 429 38.39% 472 41.77% 514

1240 20.53% 255 27.70% 343 31.14% 386 34.72% 430 38.19% 474 41.55% 515

1250 20.44% 256 27.56% 345 30.97% 387 34.53% 432 37.99% 475 41.33% 517

1260 20.36% 256 27.43% 346 30.81% 388 34.35% 433 37.79% 476 41.11% 518

1270 20.27% 257 27.30% 347 30.65% 389 34.17% 434 37.59% 477 40.90% 519

1280 20.19% 258 27.18% 348 30.49% 390 34.00% 435 37.40% 479 40.69% 521

1290 20.11% 259 27.05% 349 30.34% 391 33.83% 436 37.21% 480 40.48% 522

1300 20.02% 260 26.93% 350 30.18% 392 33.65% 437 37.02% 481 40.28% 524

1310 19.93% 261 26.79% 351 30.02% 393 33.47% 439 36.82% 482 40.06% 525

1320 19.83% 262 26.66% 352 29.86% 394 33.30% 440 36.63% 483 39.85% 526

1330 19.74% 263 26.52% 353 29.71% 395 33.12% 441 36.43% 485 39.64% 527

1340 19.65% 263 26.39% 354 29.55% 396 32.95% 442 36.25% 486 39.43% 528

1350 19.56% 264 26.27% 355 29.40% 397 32.78% 443 36.06% 487 39.23% 530

1360 19.47% 265 26.14% 356 29.25% 398 32.61% 444 35.88% 488 39.03% 531

1370 19.38% 266 26.02% 356 29.10% 399 32.45% 445 35.69% 489 38.84% 532

1380 19.29% 266 25.90% 357 28.96% 400 32.29% 446 35.52% 490 38.64% 533

1390 19.21% 267 25.77% 358 28.81% 401 32.13% 447 35.34% 491 38.45% 534

1400 19.12% 268 25.66% 359 28.67% 401 31.97% 448 35.17% 492 38.26% 536

1410 19.04% 268 25.54% 360 28.53% 402 31.82% 449 35.00% 493 38.08% 537

1420 18.96% 269 25.42% 361 28.40% 403 31.66% 450 34.83% 495 37.89% 538

1430 18.88% 270 25.31% 362 28.26% 404 31.51% 451 34.66% 496 37.71% 539

1440 18.80% 271 25.20% 363 28.13% 405 31.36% 452 34.50% 497 37.54% 541

1450 18.72% 271 25.09% 364 28.00% 406 31.22% 453 34.34% 498 37.36% 542

1460 18.64% 272 24.98% 365 27.87% 407 31.07% 454 34.18% 499 37.19% 543

1470 18.57% 273 24.87% 366 27.74% 408 30.93% 455 34.02% 500 37.02% 544

1480 18.49% 274 24.76% 367 27.61% 409 30.79% 456 33.87% 501 36.85% 545

1490 18.42% 274 24.66% 367 27.49% 410 30.65% 457 33.71% 502 36.68% 547

– 13 –

CONNECTICUT CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES

SCHEDULE OF BASIC CHILD SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS

($1500 – $1990 COMBINED NET WEEKLY INCOME)

1 Child 2 Children 3 Children 4 Children 5 Children 6 Children

Combined

Net

Weekly

Income % $ % $ % $ % $ % $ % $

1500 18.35% 275 24.56% 368 27.37% 410 30.51% 458 33.56% 503 36.52% 548

1510 18.27% 276 24.45% 369 27.24% 411 30.38% 459 33.41% 505 36.36% 549

1520 18.20% 277 24.35% 370 27.12% 412 30.24% 460 33.27% 506 36.20% 550

1530 18.13% 277 24.25% 371 27.01% 413 30.11% 461 33.12% 507 36.04% 551

1540 18.06% 278 24.16% 372 26.89% 414 29.98% 462 32.98% 508 35.88% 553

1550 18.00% 279 24.06% 373 26.77% 415 29.85% 463 32.84% 509 35.73% 554

1560 17.93% 280 23.96% 374 26.66% 416 29.73% 464 32.70% 510 35.58% 555

1570 17.86% 280 23.87% 375 26.55% 417 29.60% 465 32.56% 511 35.43% 556

1580 17.80% 281 23.78% 376 26.44% 418 29.48% 466 32.43% 512 35.28% 557

1590 17.73% 282 23.68% 377 26.33% 419 29.36% 467 32.29% 513 35.13% 559

1600 17.67% 283 23.59% 377 26.22% 420 29.24% 468 32.16% 515 34.99% 560

1610 17.60% 283 23.50% 378 26.11% 420 29.12% 469 32.03% 516 34.85% 561

1620 17.54% 284 23.42% 379 26.01% 421 29.00% 470 31.90% 517 34.71% 562

1630 17.48% 285 23.33% 380 25.91% 422 28.88% 471 31.77% 518 34.57% 563

1640 17.42% 286 23.24% 381 25.80% 423 28.77% 472 31.65% 519 34.43% 565

1650 17.36% 286 23.16% 382 25.70% 424 28.66% 473 31.52% 520 34.30% 566

1660 17.30% 287 23.07% 383 25.60% 425 28.54% 474 31.40% 521 34.16% 567

1670 17.24% 288 22.99% 384 25.50% 426 28.43% 475 31.28% 522 34.03% 568

1680 17.18% 289 22.91% 385 25.40% 427 28.32% 476 31.16% 523 33.90% 570

1690 17.13% 290 22.84% 386 25.32% 428 28.23% 477 31.06% 525 33.79% 571

1700 17.09% 290 22.77% 387 25.25% 429 28.15% 479 30.97% 526 33.69% 573

1710 17.04% 291 22.71% 388 25.17% 430 28.07% 480 30.88% 528 33.59% 574

1720 17.00% 292 22.65% 390 25.10% 432 27.99% 481 30.79% 530 33.50% 576

1730 16.95% 293 22.58% 391 25.03% 433 27.91% 483 30.70% 531 33.40% 578

1740 16.91% 294 22.52% 392 24.96% 434 27.83% 484 30.61% 533 33.31% 580

1750 16.87% 295 22.46% 393 24.89% 436 27.75% 486 30.53% 534 33.21% 581

1760 16.82% 296 22.40% 394 24.82% 437 27.67% 487 30.44% 536 33.12% 583

1770 16.78% 297 22.34% 395 24.75% 438 27.60% 488 30.36% 537 33.03% 585

1780 16.74% 298 22.28% 397 24.68% 439 27.52% 490 30.27% 539 32.94% 586

1790 16.70% 299 22.23% 398 24.62% 441 27.45% 491 30.19% 540 32.85% 588

1800 16.66% 300 22.17% 399 24.55% 442 27.37% 493 30.11% 542 32.76% 590

1810 16.62% 301 22.11% 400 24.48% 443 27.30% 494 30.03% 544 32.67% 591

1820 16.58% 302 22.06% 401 24.42% 444 27.23% 496 29.95% 545 32.59% 593

1830 16.54% 303 22.00% 403 24.35% 446 27.16% 497 29.87% 547 32.50% 595

1840 16.50% 304 21.95% 404 24.29% 447 27.08% 498 29.79% 548 32.41% 596

1850 16.46% 305 21.89% 405 24.23% 448 27.01% 500 29.72% 550 32.33% 598

1860 16.42% 305 21.84% 406 24.17% 449 26.95% 501 29.64% 551 32.25% 600

1870 16.39% 306 21.79% 407 24.10% 451 26.88% 503 29.56% 553 32.17% 602

1880 16.35% 307 21.73% 409 24.04% 452 26.81% 504 29.49% 554 32.08% 603

1890 16.31% 308 21.68% 410 23.98% 453 26.74% 505 29.42% 556 32.00% 605

1900 16.28% 309 21.63% 411 23.92% 455 26.68% 507 29.34% 558 31.93% 607

1910 16.24% 310 21.58% 412 23.87% 456 26.61% 508 29.27% 559 31.85% 608

1920 16.20% 311 21.53% 413 23.81% 457 26.54% 510 29.20% 561 31.77% 610

1930 16.17% 312 21.48% 415 23.75% 458 26.48% 511 29.13% 562 31.69% 612

1940 16.13% 313 21.43% 416 23.69% 460 26.42% 512 29.06% 564 31.62% 613

1950 16.10% 314 21.38% 417 23.64% 461 26.35% 514 28.99% 565 31.54% 615

1960 16.06% 315 21.33% 418 23.58% 462 26.29% 515 28.92% 567 31.47% 617

1970 16.03% 316 21.28% 419 23.52% 463 26.23% 517 28.85% 568 31.39% 618

1980 16.00% 317 21.24% 421 23.47% 465 26.17% 518 28.79% 570 31.32% 620

1990 15.96% 318 21.19% 422 23.42% 466 26.11% 520 28.72% 572 31.25% 622

– 14 –

CONNECTICUT CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES

SCHEDULE OF BASIC CHILD SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS

($2000 – $2490 COMBINED NET WEEKLY INCOME)

1 Child 2 Children 3 Children 4 Children 5 Children 6 Children

Combined

Net

Weekly

Income % $ % $ % $ % $ % $ % $

2000 15.93% 319 21.14% 423 23.36% 467 26.05% 521 28.65% 573 31.17% 623

2010 15.90% 320 21.10% 424 23.31% 468 25.99% 522 28.59% 575 31.10% 625

2020 15.87% 320 21.05% 425 23.26% 470 25.93% 524 28.52% 576 31.03% 627

2030 15.83% 321 21.01% 426 23.20% 471 25.87% 525 28.46% 578 30.96% 629

2040 15.80% 322 20.96% 428 23.15% 472 25.81% 527 28.40% 579 30.89% 630

2050 15.77% 323 20.92% 429 23.10% 474 25.76% 528 28.33% 581 30.83% 632

2060 15.74% 324 20.88% 430 23.05% 475 25.70% 529 28.27% 582 30.76% 634

2070 15.71% 325 20.83% 431 23.00% 476 25.65% 531 28.21% 584 30.69% 635

2080 15.68% 326 20.79% 432 22.95% 477 25.59% 532 28.15% 585 30.63% 637

2090 15.65% 327 20.75% 434 22.90% 479 25.53% 534 28.09% 587 30.56% 639

2100 15.62% 328 20.71% 435 22.85% 480 25.48% 535 28.03% 589 30.50% 640

2110 15.59% 329 20.66% 436 22.80% 481 25.43% 537 27.97% 590 30.43% 642

2120 15.56% 330 20.62% 437 22.76% 482 25.37% 538 27.91% 592 30.37% 644

2130 15.53% 331 20.58% 438 22.71% 484 25.32% 539 27.85% 593 30.30% 645

2140 15.50% 332 20.54% 440 22.66% 485 25.27% 541 27.80% 595 30.24% 647

2150 15.47% 333 20.50% 441 22.62% 486 25.22% 542 27.74% 596 30.18% 649

2160 15.45% 334 20.46% 442 22.57% 488 25.17% 544 27.68% 598 30.12% 651

2170 15.42% 335 20.43% 443 22.53% 489 25.12% 545 27.63% 600 30.06% 652

2180 15.40% 336 20.40% 445 22.49% 490 25.08% 547 27.59% 601 30.01% 654

2190 15.38% 337 20.36% 446 22.45% 492 25.04% 548 27.54% 603 29.96% 656

2200 15.36% 338 20.33% 447 22.42% 493 25.00% 550 27.50% 605 29.92% 658

2210 15.34% 339 20.30% 449 22.38% 495 24.96% 552 27.45% 607 29.87% 660

2220 15.32% 340 20.27% 450 22.35% 496 24.92% 553 27.41% 608 29.82% 662

2230 15.30% 341 20.24% 451 22.31% 498 24.88% 555 27.36% 610 29.77% 664

2240 15.28% 342 20.21% 453 22.27% 499 24.84% 556 27.32% 612 29.72% 666

2250 15.26% 343 20.18% 454 22.24% 500 24.80% 558 27.28% 614 29.68% 668

2260 15.24% 344 20.15% 455 22.20% 502 24.76% 560 27.23% 615 29.63% 670

2270 15.22% 345 20.13% 457 22.17% 503 24.72% 561 27.19% 617 29.58% 672

2280 15.20% 347 20.10% 458 22.14% 505 24.68% 563 27.15% 619 29.54% 673

2290 15.18% 348 20.07% 460 22.10% 506 24.64% 564 27.11% 621 29.49% 675

2300 15.16% 349 20.04% 461 22.07% 508 24.61% 566 27.07% 623 29.45% 677

2310 15.14% 350 20.01% 462 22.04% 509 24.57% 568 27.03% 624 29.40% 679

2320 15.12% 351 19.98% 464 22.00% 510 24.53% 569 26.99% 626 29.36% 681

2330 15.10% 352 19.96% 465 21.97% 512 24.50% 571 26.95% 628 29.32% 683

2340 15.08% 353 19.93% 466 21.94% 513 24.46% 572 26.91% 630 29.27% 685

2350 15.07% 354 19.90% 468 21.91% 515 24.42% 574 26.87% 631 29.23% 687

2360 15.05% 355 19.88% 469 21.87% 516 24.39% 576 26.83% 633 29.19% 689

2370 15.03% 356 19.85% 470 21.84% 518 24.35% 577 26.79% 635 29.15% 691

2380 15.01% 357 19.82% 472 21.81% 519 24.32% 579 26.75% 637 29.10% 693

2390 14.99% 358 19.80% 473 21.78% 521 24.28% 580 26.71% 638 29.06% 695

2400 14.98% 359 19.77% 474 21.75% 522 24.25% 582 26.67% 640 29.02% 697

2410 14.96% 361 19.74% 476 21.72% 523 24.22% 584 26.64% 642 28.98% 698

2420 14.94% 362 19.72% 477 21.69% 525 24.18% 585 26.60% 644 28.94% 700

2430 14.93% 363 19.69% 479 21.66% 526 24.15% 587 26.56% 645 28.90% 702

2440 14.91% 364 19.67% 480 21.63% 528 24.11% 588 26.53% 647 28.86% 704

2450 14.89% 365 19.64% 481 21.60% 529 24.08% 590 26.49% 649 28.82% 706

2460 14.87% 366 19.62% 483 21.57% 531 24.05% 592 26.45% 651 28.78% 708

2470 14.86% 367 19.60% 484 21.54% 532 24.02% 593 26.42% 653 28.74% 710

2480 14.84% 368 19.57% 485 21.51% 533 23.98% 595 26.38% 654 28.70% 712

2490 14.83% 369 19.55% 487 21.48% 535 23.95% 596 26.35% 656 28.67% 714

– 15 –

CONNECTICUT CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES

SCHEDULE OF BASIC CHILD SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS

($2500 – $2990 COMBINED NET WEEKLY INCOME)

1 Child 2 Children 3 Children 4 Children 5 Children 6 Children

Combined

Net

Weekly

Income % $ % $ % $ % $ % $ % $

2500 14.81% 370 19.52% 488 21.45% 536 23.92% 598 26.31% 658 28.63% 716

2510 14.79% 371 19.50% 489 21.43% 538 23.89% 600 26.28% 660 28.59% 718

2520 14.78% 372 19.48% 491 21.40% 539 23.86% 601 26.24% 661 28.55% 720

2530 14.76% 373 19.45% 492 21.37% 541 23.83% 603 26.21% 663 28.52% 721

2540 14.75% 375 19.43% 494 21.34% 542 23.80% 604 26.18% 665 28.48% 723

2550 14.73% 376 19.41% 495 21.32% 544 23.77% 606 26.14% 667 28.44% 725

2560 14.71% 377 19.38% 496 21.29% 545 23.74% 608 26.11% 668 28.41% 727

2570 14.70% 378 19.36% 498 21.26% 546 23.71% 609 26.08% 670 28.37% 729

2580 14.68% 379 19.34% 499 21.23% 548 23.68% 611 26.04% 672 28.34% 731

2590 14.67% 380 19.32% 500 21.21% 549 23.65% 612 26.01% 674 28.30% 733

2600 14.65% 381 19.29% 502 21.18% 551 23.62% 614 25.98% 675 28.27% 735

2610 14.64% 382 19.27% 503 21.16% 552 23.59% 616 25.95% 677 28.23% 737

2620 14.62% 383 19.25% 504 21.13% 554 23.56% 617 25.92% 679 28.20% 739

2630 14.61% 384 19.23% 506 21.10% 555 23.53% 619 25.88% 681 28.16% 741

2640 14.60% 385 19.21% 507 21.08% 556 23.50% 620 25.85% 683 28.13% 743

2650 14.57% 386 19.18% 508 21.04% 558 23.46% 622 25.81% 684 28.08% 744

2660 14.54% 387 19.14% 509 21.00% 559 23.41% 623 25.76% 685 28.02% 745

2670 14.51% 387 19.10% 510 20.96% 560 23.37% 624 25.70% 686 27.97% 747

2680 14.48% 388 19.07% 511 20.91% 560 23.32% 625 25.65% 687 27.91% 748

2690 14.45% 389 19.03% 512 20.87% 561 23.27% 626 25.60% 689 27.85% 749

2700 14.42% 389 19.00% 513 20.83% 562 23.23% 627 25.55% 690 27.80% 750

2710 14.39% 390 18.96% 514 20.79% 563 23.18% 628 25.50% 691 27.74% 752

2720 14.36% 391 18.93% 515 20.75% 564 23.13% 629 25.45% 692 27.69% 753

2730 14.33% 391 18.89% 516 20.71% 565 23.09% 630 25.40% 693 27.63% 754

2740 14.30% 392 18.86% 517 20.66% 566 23.04% 631 25.35% 694 27.58% 756

2750 14.28% 393 18.82% 518 20.62% 567 23.00% 632 25.30% 696 27.52% 757

2760 14.25% 393 18.79% 519 20.58% 568 22.95% 633 25.25% 697 27.47% 758

2770 14.22% 394 18.76% 520 20.54% 569 22.91% 635 25.20% 698 27.41% 759

2780 14.19% 395 18.72% 520 20.50% 570 22.86% 636 25.15% 699 27.36% 761

2790 14.16% 395 18.69% 521 20.47% 571 22.82% 637 25.10% 700 27.31% 762

2800 14.14% 396 18.66% 522 20.43% 572 22.78% 638 25.05% 701 27.26% 763

2810 14.11% 396 18.62% 523 20.39% 573 22.73% 639 25.01% 703 27.21% 764

2820 14.08% 397 18.59% 524 20.35% 574 22.69% 640 24.96% 704 27.15% 766

2830 14.06% 398 18.56% 525 20.31% 575 22.65% 641 24.91% 705 27.10% 767

2840 14.03% 398 18.53% 526 20.27% 576 22.60% 642 24.86% 706 27.05% 768

2850 14.00% 399 18.49% 527 20.24% 577 22.56% 643 24.82% 707 27.00% 770

2860 13.98% 400 18.46% 528 20.20% 578 22.52% 644 24.77% 708 26.95% 771

2870 13.95% 400 18.43% 529 20.16% 579 22.48% 645 24.73% 710 26.90% 772

2880 13.92% 401 18.40% 530 20.12% 580 22.44% 646 24.68% 711 26.85% 773

2890 13.90% 402 18.37% 531 20.09% 581 22.40% 647 24.64% 712 26.80% 775

2900 13.87% 402 18.34% 532 20.05% 581 22.36% 648 24.59% 713 26.76% 776

2910 13.85% 403 18.31% 533 20.01% 582 22.32% 649 24.55% 714 26.71% 777

2920 13.82% 404 18.28% 534 19.98% 583 22.28% 650 24.50% 716 26.66% 778

2930 13.80% 404 18.25% 535 19.94% 584 22.24% 652 24.46% 717 26.61% 780

2940 13.77% 405 18.22% 536 19.91% 585 22.20% 653 24.42% 718 26.56% 781

2950 13.75% 406 18.19% 537 19.87% 586 22.16% 654 24.37% 719 26.52% 782

2960 13.72% 406 18.16% 537 19.84% 587 22.12% 655 24.33% 720 26.47% 784

2970 13.70% 407 18.13% 538 19.80% 588 22.08% 656 24.29% 721 26.43% 785

2980 13.67% 407 18.10% 539 19.77% 589 22.04% 657 24.25% 723 26.38% 786

2990 13.65% 408 18.07% 540 19.73% 590 22.00% 658 24.20% 724 26.33% 787

– 16 –

CONNECTICUT CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES

SCHEDULE OF BASIC CHILD SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS

($3000 – $3490 COMBINED NET WEEKLY INCOME)

1 Child 2 Children 3 Children 4 Children 5 Children 6 Children

Combined

Net

Weekly

Income % $ % $ % $ % $ % $ % $

3000 13.62% 409 18.04% 541 19.70% 591 21.97% 659 24.16% 725 26.29% 789

3010 13.60% 409 18.01% 542 19.67% 592 21.93% 660 24.12% 726 26.24% 790

3020 13.58% 410 17.98% 543 19.63% 593 21.89% 661 24.08% 727 26.20% 791

3030 13.55% 411 17.96% 544 19.60% 594 21.85% 662 24.04% 728 26.15% 792

3040 13.53% 411 17.93% 545 19.57% 595 21.82% 663 24.00% 730 26.11% 794

3050 13.51% 412 17.90% 546 19.53% 596 21.78% 664 23.96% 731 26.07% 795

3060 13.48% 413 17.87% 547 19.50% 597 21.74% 665 23.92% 732 26.02% 796

3070 13.46% 413 17.84% 548 19.47% 598 21.71% 666 23.88% 733 25.98% 798

3080 13.44% 414 17.82% 549 19.44% 599 21.67% 667 23.84% 734 25.94% 799

3090 13.42% 415 17.79% 550 19.40% 600 21.63% 669 23.80% 735 25.89% 800

3100 13.39% 415 17.76% 551 19.37% 601 21.60% 670 23.76% 737 25.85% 801

3110 13.37% 416 17.74% 552 19.34% 601 21.56% 671 23.72% 738 25.81% 803

3120 13.35% 416 17.71% 553 19.31% 602 21.53% 672 23.68% 739 25.77% 804

3130 13.33% 417 17.68% 554 19.28% 603 21.49% 673 23.64% 740 25.72% 805

3140 13.31% 418 17.66% 554 19.25% 604 21.46% 674 23.61% 741 25.68% 806

3150 13.28% 418 17.63% 555 19.22% 605 21.43% 675 23.57% 742 25.64% 808

3160 13.26% 419 17.61% 556 19.18% 606 21.39% 676 23.53% 744 25.60% 809

3170 13.24% 420 17.58% 557 19.15% 607 21.36% 677 23.49% 745 25.56% 810

3180 13.22% 420 17.55% 558 19.12% 608 21.32% 678 23.46% 746 25.52% 812

3190 13.20% 421 17.53% 559 19.09% 609 21.29% 679 23.42% 747 25.48% 813

3200 13.18% 422 17.50% 560 19.06% 610 21.26% 680 23.38% 748 25.44% 814

3210 13.16% 422 17.48% 561 19.03% 611 21.22% 681 23.35% 749 25.40% 815

3220 13.14% 423 17.45% 562 19.00% 612 21.19% 682 23.31% 751 25.36% 817

3230 13.11% 424 17.43% 563 18.98% 613 21.16% 683 23.27% 752 25.32% 818

3240 13.09% 424 17.40% 564 18.95% 614 21.13% 684 23.24% 753 25.28% 819

3250 13.07% 425 17.38% 565 18.92% 615 21.09% 686 23.20% 754 25.24% 820

3260 13.05% 426 17.35% 566 18.89% 616 21.06% 687 23.17% 755 25.21% 822

3270 13.03% 426 17.33% 567 18.86% 617 21.03% 688 23.13% 756 25.17% 823

3280 13.01% 427 17.31% 568 18.83% 618 21.00% 689 23.10% 758 25.13% 824

3290 12.99% 427 17.28% 569 18.80% 619 20.97% 690 23.06% 759 25.09% 826

3300 12.97% 428 17.26% 570 18.78% 620 20.93% 691 23.03% 760 25.05% 827

3310 12.95% 429 17.24% 570 18.75% 621 20.90% 692 22.99% 761 25.02% 828

3320 12.93% 429 17.21% 571 18.72% 621 20.87% 693 22.96% 762 24.98% 829

3330 12.91% 430 17.19% 572 18.69% 622 20.84% 694 22.93% 763 24.94% 831

3340 12.90% 431 17.17% 573 18.66% 623 20.81% 695 22.89% 765 24.91% 832

3350 12.88% 431 17.14% 574 18.64% 624 20.78% 696 22.86% 766 24.87% 833

3360 12.86% 432 17.12% 575 18.61% 625 20.75% 697 22.83% 767 24.83% 834

3370 12.84% 433 17.10% 576 18.58% 626 20.72% 698 22.79% 768 24.80% 836

3380 12.82% 433 17.07% 577 18.56% 627 20.69% 699 22.76% 769 24.76% 837

3390 12.80% 434 17.05% 578 18.53% 628 20.66% 700 22.73% 770 24.73% 838

3400 12.78% 435 17.03% 579 18.50% 629 20.63% 701 22.69% 772 24.69% 840

3410 12.76% 435 17.01% 580 18.48% 630 20.60% 703 22.66% 773 24.66% 841

3420 12.74% 436 16.98% 581 18.45% 631 20.57% 704 22.63% 774 24.62% 842

3430 12.73% 437 16.96% 582 18.42% 632 20.54% 705 22.60% 775 24.59% 843

3440 12.71% 437 16.94% 583 18.40% 633 20.51% 706 22.57% 776 24.55% 845

3450 12.69% 438 16.92% 584 18.37% 634 20.49% 707 22.53% 777 24.52% 846

3460 12.67% 438 16.90% 585 18.35% 635 20.46% 708 22.50% 779 24.48% 847

3470 12.65% 439 16.88% 586 18.32% 636 20.43% 709 22.47% 780 24.45% 848

3480 12.64% 440 16.85% 587 18.30% 637 20.40% 710 22.44% 781 24.42% 850

3490 12.62% 440 16.83% 587 18.27% 638 20.37% 711 22.41% 782 24.38% 851

– 17 –

CONNECTICUT CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES

SCHEDULE OF BASIC CHILD SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS

($3500 – $4000 COMBINED NET WEEKLY INCOME)

1 Child 2 Children 3 Children 4 Children 5 Children 6 Children

Combined

Net

Weekly

Income % $ % $ % $ % $ % $ % $

3500 12.60% 441 16.81% 588 18.25% 639 20.35% 712 22.38% 783 24.35% 852

3510 12.58% 442 16.79% 589 18.22% 640 20.32% 713 22.35% 784 24.32% 853

3520 12.57% 442 16.77% 590 18.20% 641 20.29% 714 22.32% 786 24.28% 855

3530 12.55% 443 16.75% 591 18.17% 642 20.26% 715 22.29% 787 24.25% 856

3540 12.53% 444 16.73% 592 18.15% 642 20.24% 716 22.26% 788 24.22% 857

3550 12.51% 444 16.71% 593 18.12% 643 20.21% 717 22.23% 789 24.19% 859

3560 12.50% 445 16.69% 594 18.10% 644 20.18% 718 22.20% 790 24.15% 860

3570 12.48% 446 16.67% 595 18.08% 645 20.15% 720 22.17% 791 24.12% 861

3580 12.46% 446 16.65% 596 18.05% 646 20.13% 721 22.14% 793 24.09% 862

3590 12.45% 447 16.63% 597 18.03% 647 20.10% 722 22.11% 794 24.06% 864

3600 12.43% 447 16.61% 598 18.00% 648 20.08% 723 22.08% 795 24.03% 865

3610 12.41% 448 16.59% 599 17.98% 649 20.05% 724 22.05% 796 23.99% 866

3620 12.40% 449 16.57% 600 17.96% 650 20.02% 725 22.03% 797 23.96% 867

3630 12.38% 449 16.55% 601 17.93% 651 20.00% 726 22.00% 798 23.93% 869

3640 12.36% 450 16.53% 602 17.91% 652 19.97% 727 21.97% 800 23.90% 870

3650 12.35% 451 16.51% 603 17.89% 653 19.95% 728 21.94% 801 23.87% 871

3660 12.33% 451 16.49% 604 17.87% 654 19.92% 729 21.91% 802 23.84% 873

3670 12.32% 452 16.47% 604 17.84% 655 19.90% 730 21.88% 803 23.81% 874

3680 12.30% 453 16.45% 605 17.82% 656 19.87% 731 21.86% 804 23.78% 875

3690 12.28% 453 16.43% 606 17.80% 657 19.84% 732 21.83% 806 23.75% 876

3700 12.27% 454 16.41% 607 17.78% 658 19.82% 733 21.80% 807 23.72% 878

3710 12.25% 455 16.39% 608 17.75% 659 19.80% 734 21.77% 808 23.69% 879

3720 12.24% 455 16.38% 609 17.73% 660 19.77% 735 21.75% 809 23.66% 880

3730 12.22% 456 16.36% 610 17.71% 661 19.75% 737 21.72% 810 23.63% 881

3740 12.21% 457 16.34% 611 17.69% 662 19.72% 738 21.69% 811 23.60% 883

3750 12.19% 457 16.32% 612 17.67% 662 19.70% 739 21.67% 813 23.57% 884

3760 12.18% 458 16.30% 613 17.64% 663 19.67% 740 21.64% 814 23.54% 885

3770 12.16% 458 16.28% 614 17.62% 664 19.65% 741 21.61% 815 23.52% 887

3780 12.15% 459 16.27% 615 17.60% 665 19.63% 742 21.59% 816 23.49% 888

3790 12.13% 460 16.25% 616 17.58% 666 19.60% 743 21.56% 817 23.46% 889

3800 12.12% 460 16.23% 617 17.56% 667 19.58% 744 21.54% 818 23.43% 890

3810 12.10% 461 16.21% 618 17.54% 668 19.55% 745 21.51% 820 23.40% 892

3820 12.09% 462 16.19% 619 17.52% 669 19.53% 746 21.48% 821 23.37% 893

3830 12.07% 462 16.18% 620 17.50% 670 19.51% 747 21.46% 822 23.35% 894

3840 12.06% 463 16.16% 620 17.48% 671 19.48% 748 21.43% 823 23.32% 895

3850 12.04% 464 16.14% 621 17.45% 672 19.46% 749 21.41% 824 23.29% 897

3860 12.03% 464 16.12% 622 17.43% 673 19.44% 750 21.38% 825 23.26% 898

3870 12.01% 465 16.11% 623 17.41% 674 19.42% 751 21.36% 827 23.24% 899

3880 12.00% 466 16.09% 624 17.39% 675 19.39% 752 21.33% 828 23.21% 901

3890 11.99% 466 16.07% 625 17.37% 676 19.37% 754 21.31% 829 23.18% 902

3900 11.97% 467 16.06% 626 17.35% 677 19.35% 755 21.28% 830 23.16% 903

3910 11.96% 468 16.04% 627 17.33% 678 19.33% 756 21.26% 831 23.13% 904

3920 11.94% 468 16.02% 628 17.31% 679 19.30% 757 21.23% 832 23.10% 906

3930 11.93% 469 16.00% 629 17.29% 680 19.28% 758 21.21% 834 23.08% 907

3940 11.91% 469 15.99% 630 17.27% 681 19.26% 759 21.19% 835 23.05% 908

3950 11.90% 470 15.97% 631 17.25% 682 19.24% 760 21.16% 836 23.02% 909

3960 11.89% 471 15.96% 632 17.23% 682 19.22% 761 21.14% 837 23.00% 911

3970 11.87% 471 15.94% 633 17.21% 683 19.19% 762 21.11% 838 22.97% 912

3980 11.86% 472 15.92% 634 17.20% 684 19.17% 763 21.09% 839 22.95% 913

3990 11.85% 473 15.91% 635 17.18% 685 19.15% 764 21.07% 841 22.92% 915

4000 11.83% 473 15.89% 636 17.16% 686 19.13% 765 21.04% 842 22.90% 916

– 18 –

(g) Determining the health care coverage contribution

Subject to section 46b-215a-3 of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, each child support award entered under this section shall include a provision for either parent to contribute to the health care coverage of the child in accordance with this subsection.

(1) Medical or dental insurance coverage

The health care coverage requirement may be satisfied by an order under subparagraph (A) or (B) of this subdivision.

(A) An order under this subparagraph shall direct either parent to name the child as a beneficiary of any medical or dental insurance or benefit plan:

(i) carried by such parent, or

(ii) available at reasonable cost to such parent on a group basis through an employer or a union.

(B) If coverage in accordance with subparagraph (A) is unavailable, an order under this subparagraph shall direct either parent to apply for coverage on behalf of the child under any available state or federally funded insurance plan including, but not limited to, the Husky Plan, Part B.

(2) Exception for low-income obligors

Notwithstanding subdivision (1) of this subsection, no order shall enter for payment of Husky Plan, Part A or Part B, contributions by a low-income obligor.

(3) Payment of unreimbursed expenses

An order shall be made under this subdivision for payment of the child’s medical and dental expenses that are not covered by insurance or reimbursed in any other manner. Such order may be in lieu of an order under subdivision (1) of this subsection, or in addition to an order under such subdivision. The amount of such order to be paid by each parent shall be determined in accordance with subparagraphs (A) to (D), inclusive, of this subdivision.

(A) Calculate the custodial parent’s net disposable income, as defined in section 46b-215a-1(16) of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, in the following manner:

(i) Add the recommended current support order (line 34 amount) to the custodial parent’s line 14 amount. Enter the sum on line 21 in the custodial parent’s column.

(ii) Enter the weekly amount of any alimony paid by one parent to the other on line 22, and check the appropriate box to indicate which parent pays it.

(iii) Multiply the line 22 amount by eighty percent, and enter on line 23.

(iv) If the noncustodial parent pays alimony to the custodial parent, add the line 23 amount to the custodial parent’s line 21 amount, and enter the sum on line 24 in the custodial parent’s column. If the custodial parent pays alimony to the noncustodial parent, subtract the line 23 amount from the custodial parent’s line 21 amount, and enter the result on line 24 in the custodial parent’s column.

(v) If there is an amount on line 19 in the noncustodial parent’s column, enter it on line 25.

(vi) Add the line 25 amount to the custodial parent’s line 24 amount, and enter on line 26 in the custodial parent’s column. This line 26 amount is the custodial parent’s net disposable income.

– 19 –

(B) Calculate the noncustodial parent’s net disposable income, as defined in section 46b-215a-1(16) of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, in the following manner:

(i) Subtract the recommended current support order (line 34 amount) from the noncustodial parent’s line 14 amount. Enter the result on line 21 in the noncustodial parent’s column.

(ii) Enter the weekly amount of any alimony paid by one parent to the other on line 22, and check the appropriate box to indicate which parent pays it.

(iii) Multiply the line 22 amount by eighty percent, and enter on line 23.

(iv) If the noncustodial parent pays alimony to the custodial parent, subtract the line 23 amount from the noncustodial parent’s line 21 amount, and enter the result on line 24 in the noncustodial parent’s column. If the custodial parent pays alimony to the noncustodial parent, add the line 23 amount to the noncustodial parent’s line 21 amount, and enter the sum on line 24 in the noncustodial parent’s column.

(v) If there is an amount on line 19 in the noncustodial parent’s column, enter it on line 25.

(vi) Subtract the line 25 amount from the noncustodial parent’s line 24 amount, and enter on line 26 in the noncustodial parent’s column. This line 26 amount is the noncustodial parent’s net disposable income.

(C) Calculate each parent’s percentage share of combined net disposable income in the following manner:

(i) Enter the sum of the custodial and noncustodial parents’ line 26 amounts on line 27. This amount is the combined net disposable income.

(ii) Divide each parent’s line 26 amount by the line 27 amount, multiply each result by one hundred percent, and enter each parent’s percentage (rounded to the nearest whole percentage) on line 28.

(D) Determine the recommended order for unreimbursed medical expenses in the following manner:

(i) If the noncustodial parent is a low-income obligor, enter the lesser of: (I) such parent’s percentage share from line 28, or (II) fifty percent on line 35 for such parent; and enter one hundred percent minus the percentage entered for the noncustodial parent on line 35 for the custodial parent.

(ii) If the noncustodial parent is not a low-income obligor, enter the percentage share from line 28 for each parent on line 35.

(h) Determining the child care contribution

(1) General rule

Subject to section 46b-215a-3 of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, the noncustodial parent shall be ordered to pay the custodial parent a child care contribution as part of each child support award entered under this section. Such contribution shall be for the purpose of reimbursing the custodial parent for a portion of the child care costs incurred on behalf of the subject child.

(2) Contribution amount

(A) Qualifying costs

Child care costs shall qualify for a contribution from the noncustodial parent only to the extent that they:

– 20 –

(i) are reasonable,

(ii) are necessary to allow a parent to maintain employment,

(iii) are not otherwise reimbursed or subsidized, and

(iv) do not exceed the level required to provide quality care from a licensed source.

(B) Noncustodial parent’s share

Except as provided in subdivision (3) of this subsection, the amount of the child care contribution, to be entered on line 36 of the worksheet, shall equal the amount determined in subclause

(i) or (ii) of this subparagraph, as follows:

(i) the noncustodial parent’s percentage share of combined net disposable income, as entered on line 28 of the worksheet, multiplied by the qualifying child care costs as they are incurred, or

(ii) where there is a finding of noncompliance with a prior child care contribution order, a weekly dollar amount calculated by multiplying the noncustodial parent’s percentage share of combined net disposable income, as entered on line 28 of the worksheet, by the estimated average qualifying child care costs.

(3) Special rules for low-income obligors

(A) Definition of “low-income obligor"

For the purposes of this subdivision only, the term “low-income obligor" shall include those obligors whose net disposable income (amount on line 26 of the worksheet) is within the darker shaded area of the schedule.

(B) Child care contribution limits

(i) If the custodial parent’s net disposable income (amount on line 26 of the worksheet) is within the darker shaded area of the schedule, the child care contribution of the lowincome obligor shall equal the lesser of the noncustodial parent’s line 28 percentage or fifty percent of the qualifying child care costs. Enter the correct percentage, or the corresponding dollar amount in conjunction with a finding of noncompliance, on line 36 of the worksheet.

(ii) If the custodial parent’s net disposable income (amount on line 26 of the worksheet) is outside the darker shaded area of the schedule, the child care contribution of the lowincome obligor, to be entered on line 36 of the worksheet, shall equal:

(I) twenty percent of the qualifying child care costs, in lieu of the amount provided in subdivision (2)(B)(i) of this subsection; or

(II) where there is a finding of noncompliance with a prior child care contribution, a weekly dollar amount equal to twenty percent of the estimated average qualifying child care costs, in lieu of the amount provided in subdivision (2)(B)(ii) of this subsection.

– 21 –

Section 46b-215a-3. Deviation criteria

(a) Introduction

The current support, health care coverage contribution, and child care contribution amounts calculated under section 46b-215a-2b of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, and the amount of the arrearage payment calculated under section 46b-215a-4a of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, are presumed to be the correct amounts to be ordered. The presumption regarding each such amount may be rebutted by a specific finding on the record that such amount would be inequitable or inappropriate in a particular case. An agreement of the parties may be sufficient to rebut the presumption when such finding cites one or more deviation criteria, which may include other equitable factors, to support such agreement. Any such finding shall state the amount that would have been required under such sections and include a factual finding to justify the variance. Only the deviation criteria stated in the lettered subparagraphs of subdivisions (1) to (6), inclusive, of subsection (b) of this section, and indicated by the check boxes in section VII of the worksheet, shall establish sufficient bases for such findings.

(b) Criteria for deviation from presumptive support amounts

(1) Other financial resources available to a parent

In some cases, a parent may have financial resources that are not included in the definition of net income, but could be used by such parent for the benefit of the child or for meeting the needs of the parent. The resources that may justify a deviation from presumptive support amounts under this subdivision are limited to the following:

(A) substantial assets, including both income-producing and non-income-producing property;

(B) the parent’s earning capacity;

(C) parental support being provided to a minor obligor;

(D) the regularly recurring contributions or gifts of a spouse or domestic partner, but only if it is found that the parent has reduced his or her income or has experienced an extraordinary reduction of his or her living expenses as a direct result of such contributions or gifts; and

(E) hourly wages for regular, overtime and additional employment in excess of 45 total paid hours per week, but not to exceed 52 total paid hours per week, provided:

(i) the parent has earned such wages on a regular and consistent basis, and the opportunity to earn such wages is reasonably expected to continue on a regular and consistent basis in the foreseeable future;

(ii) considering such wages as income available for the support determination is in the best interests of the child, including but not limited to parenting time, under the totality of circumstances; and

(iii) such wages shall not be considered income for order modification purposes if the parent is an obligor who is an hourly wage earner and who worked 45 hours per week or less at the time of the establishment of the support order.

(2) Extraordinary expenses for care and maintenance of the child

In some cases, a parent may be incurring extraordinary expenses that are essential for the proper care and maintenance of the child whose support is being determined. Only the following expenses, when found to be extraordinary and to exist on a substantial and continuing basis, may justify a deviation from presumptive support amounts under this subdivision:

– 22 –

(A) education expenses,

(B) unreimbursable medical expenses, and

(C) expenses for special needs.

(3) Extraordinary parental expenses

In some cases, a parent may incur extraordinary expenses that are not considered allowable deductions from gross income, but which are necessary for the parent to maintain a satisfactory parental relationship with the child, continue employment, or provide for the parent’s own medical needs. Only the following expenses, when found to be extraordinary and to exist on a substantial and continuing basis, may justify a deviation from presumptive support amounts under this subdivision:

(A) significant visitation expenses,

(B) job-related unreimbursable employment expenses of individuals who are not self-employed, and

(C) unreimbursable medical and disability-related expenses.

(4) Needs of a parent’s other dependents

In some cases, a parent may be legally responsible for the support of individuals other than the child whose support is being determined. Only the following factors may justify a deviation from presumptive support amounts under this subdivision:

(A) resources available to a qualified child for whom a deduction was taken under section 46b-215a-2b(e) of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies;

(B) child care expenses for a parent’s qualified child, as defined in section 46b-215a-2b(e)(1)(A) of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, provided such expenses may be used to deviate only from the presumptive child care contribution component of the child support award, and only when an initial child support award is being established or such parent is defending against a proposed modification of an existing child care contribution;

(C) verified support payments made by a parent for his or her dependent child not residing with such parent; and

(D) the significant and essential needs of a spouse, provided

(i) such needs may be used as a possible defense against an increase in the support order, but not as a reason for decreasing such order, and

(ii) the income, assets, and earning capacity of such spouse shall be considered in determining whether to deviate.

(5) Coordination of total family support

In some cases, child support is considered in conjunction with a determination of total family support, property settlement, and tax implications. When such considerations will not result in a lesser economic benefit to the child, it may be appropriate to deviate from presumptive support amounts for the following reasons only:

(A) division of assets and liabilities,

(B) provision of alimony, and

(C) tax planning considerations.

– 23 –

(6) Special circumstances

In some cases, there may be special circumstances not otherwise addressed in this section in which deviation from presumptive support amounts may be warranted for reasons of equity. Such circumstances are limited to the following:

(A) Shared physical custody.

When a shared physical custody arrangement exists, deviation is warranted only when:

(i) such arrangement substantially reduces the custodial parent’s, or substantially increases the noncustodial parent’s, expenses for the child; and

(ii) sufficient funds remain for the parent receiving support to meet the basic needs of the child after deviation.

(B) Extraordinary disparity in parental income.

When the custodial parent has high income, resulting in an extraordinary disparity between the parents’ net incomes, it may be appropriate to deviate from presumptive support amounts if:

(i) such deviation would enhance the lower income parent’s ability to foster a relationship with the child; and

(ii) sufficient funds remain for the parent receiving support to meet the basic needs of the child after deviation.

(C) Best interests of the child.

(D) Other equitable factors.

Section 46b-215a-4a. Arrearage guidelines

(a) Scope of section

This section shall be used to determine periodic payments on child support arrearages, subject to section 46b-215a-3 of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies. The determination of lump sum payments remains subject to the discretion of the judge or family support magistrate, in accordance with existing law.

(b) General rule

(1) Except as provided in subsections (c), (d) and (e) of this section, the weekly arrearage payment shall equal the lesser of:

(A) twenty percent of the weekly current support order, or

(B) fifty-five percent of the obligor’s net income, reduced by the amount of the current support order.

(2) In a Title IV-D case where arrearages are owing to both the state and a custodial parent, one payment order shall enter under which payments shall be distributed in accordance with Title IV-D distribution requirements. Such order shall be payable to the custodial parent until the custodial parent’s arrearage is satisfied, and then to the state.

(c) Special rule for low-income obligors

Subject to subsection (e)(1) of this section, the weekly arrearage payment of a low-income obligor shall equal the greater of:

– 24 –

(1) ten percent of the weekly current support order, or

(2) one dollar per week.

(d) Special rule if there is no current support order

Subject to subsection (e)(1) of this section, the weekly arrearage payment when there is no current support order in effect for any child of the parties shall equal:

(1) twenty percent of an imputed support obligation for the child for whom the arrearage is owed if such child is an unemancipated minor, or

(2) fifty percent of an imputed support obligation for the child for whom the arrearage is owed if such child is deceased, emancipated or over age eighteen.

(e) Special rule for child living with the obligor

(1) Applicability

This subsection applies when the child for whom the arrearage is owed is living with the obligor. If this subsection applies, subsections (c) and (d) of this section shall not be used to determine the arrearage payment. For the purposes of this subsection, a child is deemed to be living with the obligor if the circumstances in either subparagraph (A) or subparagraph (B) of this subdivision are found.

(A) The obligor is the child’s legal guardian and is currently living in the same household with such child.

(B) The obligor is not the child’s legal guardian, but the child has lived in the same household with the obligor for at least:

(i) the six months immediately preceding the determination of the arrearage payment, or

(ii) six of the twelve months immediately preceding such determination.

(2) Special rule

When this subsection applies, the weekly arrearage payment shall be:

(A) one dollar per week if the obligor’s gross income is less than or equal to two hundred fifty percent of the poverty guideline for the obligor’s household size, as published annually in the Federal Register by the Department of Health and Human Services; or

(B) twenty percent of the imputed support obligation for such child if the obligor’s gross income is greater than two hundred fifty percent of the poverty guideline for the obligor’s household size, as published annually in the Federal Register by the Department of Health and Human Services.

(f) Use of the worksheet in arrearage determinations

Line references throughout this subsection are to the worksheet included in section 46b-215a-5b of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies, which worksheet is intended for use with the following instructions.

(1) Determine the total arrearage

Add all amounts described in subparagraphs (A), (B) and (C) of this subdivision to determine the total arrearage to be paid for past support of the subject child. Enter the sum on line 37, indicating

– 25 –

separately, if applicable, amounts due to the state and amounts due to the family. Amounts comprising the total arrearage are:

(A) the total of all delinquent amounts that have become due and payable under a current support order, but which have not been reduced to a judgment or an arrearage finding;

(B) the total of all unpaid support amounts that have been reduced previously to a judgment or arrearage finding; and

(C) the total of all support amounts due for periods prior to the initial determination of a support order.

(2) Determine the arrearage payment

Enter on line 32 either twenty percent of the line 34 amount or, if applicable, the amount determined in one of subparagraphs (A) to (D), inclusive, of this subdivision (corresponding to paragraphs A to D, inclusive, in section VI of the worksheet). The line 32 amount is the presumptive arrearage payment. Enter this amount on line 38 unless a deviation criterion applies. If the amount entered on line 38 differs from the line 32 amount, complete section VII of the worksheet. (A) If the noncustodial parent is a low-income obligor, enter on line 32 the greater of ten percent of the line 34 amount or $1 per week, unless subparagraph (B) of this subdivision applies. (B) If the child is living with the obligor, enter on line 32 either: (i) $1 per week if the obligor’s gross income is less than or equal to two hundred fifty percent of poverty level for the obligor’s household size, or (ii) twenty percent of an imputed support obligation for the child if the obligor’s gross income is greater than two hundred fifty percent of poverty level for the obligor’s household size.

(C) If there is no current support order and subparagraph (B) of this subdivision does not apply, enter on line 32 either: (i) twenty percent of an imputed support obligation if the child is an unemancipated minor, or (ii) fifty percent of an imputed support obligation if the child is deceased, emancipated, or over age 18.

(D) If subparagraphs (A) to (C), inclusive, of this subdivision do not apply and the sum of the current support and arrearage payments would exceed fifty-five percent of the noncustodial parent’s line 14 amount, enter fifty-five percent of the noncustodial parent’s line 14 amount, minus the line 34 amount, on line 32.

Section 46b-215a-5b. Worksheet for the Connecticut child support and arrearage guidelines The worksheet in this section is intended for use with all applicable instructions in sections 46b-215a-2b and 46b-215a-4a of the Regulations of Connecticut State Agencies. The use of computer-generated worksheets in substantially similar format is specifically authorized, provided the line numbers in such worksheets correspond to those set forth in this section. All money amounts entered on the worksheet may be rounded to the nearest dollar by dropping amounts under fifty cents and increasing amounts from fifty to ninety-nine cents to the next whole dollar. Following is form CCSG-1, Worksheet for the Connecticut Child Support and Arrearage Guidelines:

– 26 –

CCSG-1 Rev. 8-05

C.G.S. 46b-215a STATE OF CONNECTICUT

46b-215a-5b, Regulations of

Connecticut State Agencies COMMISSION FOR CHILD SUPPORT GUIDELINES WORKSHEET for the Connecticut Child Support and Arrearage Guidelines

MOTHER FATHER CUSTODIAN

MOTHER FATHER OTHER:

COURT D.N./CASE NO. NUMBER OF CHILDREN

CHILD’S NAME DATE OF BIRTH CHILD’S NAME DATE OF BIRTH CHILD’S NAME DATE OF BIRTH

All money amounts in this worksheet may be rounded to the nearest dollar

  1. NET INCOME (Weekly amounts) MOTHER FATHER

Gross income (attach verification) $ $ 1.

1a. Number of hours used in calculation

  1. Federal income tax (based on all allowable exemptions, deductions and credits) $ $
  1. Social security tax or mandatory retirement $ $
  1. Medicare tax $ $
  1. State and local income tax (based on all allowable exemptions, deductions and credits) $ $
  1. Medical/hospital/dental insurance premiums (including Husky) for parent and all legal dependents $ $
  1. Court-ordered life insurance for benefit of child $ $
  1. Court-ordered disability insurance $ $
  1. Mandatory union dues or fees (if deducted by employer) $ $
  1. Mandatory uniforms and tools (if deducted by employer) $ $
  1. Non-arrearage payments on court-ordered alimony and child support awards (for other than child) $ $
  1. Imputed support obligation for qualified child (line 12d below times the number of qualified children) $ $

MOTHER FATHER

Number of qualified children

12a. Sum of lines 2-11 $ $

12b. Line 1 minus line 12a $ $

12c. Current support amount for the parent’s qualified children plus all children for whom support is being determined (based on line 12b for claiming parent only) $ $

12d. Line 12c divided by number of children used in line 12c $ $

  1. Sum of lines 2-12 $ $
  1. Net income (line 1 minus line 13) $ $
  1. CURRENT SUPPORT
  1. Combined net weekly income (rounded to the nearest $10) $
  1. Basic child support obligation (from Schedule of Basic Child Support Obligations) $
  1. Each parent’s percentage share of line 15 (line 14 for each parent divided by line 15, times 100%) % %

(If noncustodial parent is a low-income obligor, skip this line and enter line 16 amount in noncustodial parent’s column on line 18.)

  1. Each parent’s share of the basic child support obligation (line 17 times line 16 for each parent) $ $
  1. Social security dependency benefits adjustment $ $
  1. Presumptive current support amounts (line 18 minus line 19) (Rounded to the nearest dollar)

(Enter noncustodial parent’s amount on line 34, unless deviation criteria apply – see section VII.) $ $

CONTINUED ON REVERSE

– 27 –

III. NET DISPOSABLE INCOME MOTHER FATHER

  1. Line 14 plus line 34 (for custodial parent); line 14 minus line 34 (for noncustodial parent) $ $
  1. Amount of weekly alimony (if any) (paid by: noncustodial parent custodial parent) $
  1. Line 22 times 80% $
  1. Line 21 plus line 23 (for recipient of alimony); line 21 minus line 23 (for payer of alimony) $ $
  1. Noncustodial parent’s line 19 amount (social security dependency benefits for child) $
  1. Line 24 plus line 25 (for custodial parent); line 24 minus line 25 (for noncustodial parent) $ $
  1. UNREIMBURSED MEDICAL EXPENSE
  1. Sum of line 26 amounts (combined net disposable income) $
  1. Each parent’s percentage share of combined net disposable income

(line 26 for each parent divided by line 27, times 100% – rounded to the nearest whole percentage) % %

If the noncustodial parent is a low-income obligor, proceed to line 29.

If the noncustodial parent is not a low-income obligor, enter these percentages on line 35, unless deviation criteria apply.

  1. Unless deviation criteria apply, enter on line 35 for the noncustodial parent the lesser of the noncustodial parent’s line 28 percentage or

50%; and enter on line 35 for the custodial parent 100% minus the percentage entered for the noncustodial parent.

  1. CHILD CARE CONTRIBUTION
  1. Determine if the noncustodial parent’s line 26 amount falls within the darker shaded area of the schedule. If it does, proceed to line 31.

If it does not, skip line 31 and enter the noncustodial parent’s line 28 percentage on line 36, unless deviation criteria apply.

  1. Determine if the custodial parent’s line 26 amount falls within the darker shaded area of the schedule.

If it does not, enter 20% on line 36 as the noncustodial parent’s child care contribution, unless deviation criteria apply.

If it does, enter on line 36 the lesser of the noncustodial parent’s line 28 percentage or 50%, unless deviation criteria apply.

  1. ARREARAGE PAYMENT (Enter line 32 amount on line 38 unless deviation criteria apply.)
  1. 20% of line 34: $ OR amount determined in A, B, C or D, below (check box that applies and enter amount here): $
  1. If noncustodial parent is a low-income obligor, enter the greater of 10% of line 34 or $1 per week, unless paragraph B below applies.
  1. If the child is living with the obligor, enter: (1) $1 per week if the obligor’s gross income is less than or equal to 250% of poverty level, OR (2) 20%

of an imputed support obligation for the child if the obligor’s gross income is greater than 250% of poverty level.

  1. If there is no current support order and paragraph B above does not apply, enter: (1) 20% of an imputed support obligation if the child is an unemancipated

minor, OR (2) 50% of an imputed support obligation if the child is deceased, emancipated, or over age 18.

  1. If paragraphs A, B and C, above, do not apply and the sum of the current support and arrearage payments would exceed 55% of the noncustodial

parent’s line 14 amount, enter 55% of the noncustodial parent’s line 14 amount, minus the line 34 amount.

VII. DEVIATION CRITERIA (Attach additional sheet if necessary.)

  1. Reason(s) for deviation from presumptive support amounts: (Check all boxes that apply.) Check here if deviating by agreement.

Parent’s other financial resources Extraordinary parental expenses Coordination of total family support

substantial assets significant visitation expenses division of assets and liabilities

parent’s earning capacity unreimbursed employment expenses provision of alimony

parental support provided to a minor obligor unreimbursed medical/disability expenses tax planning considerations

recurring gifts of spouse or domestic partner Needs of parent’s other dependents Special circumstances

employment over 45 hours per week resources available to qualified child shared physical custody

Extraordinary expenses for child child care expenses for qualified child extraordinary disparity in parental income

education expenses verified support for non-resident child best interests of the child

unreimbursable medical expenses significant and essential needs of a spouse other equitable factors (explain below):

special needs

VIII. RECOMMENDED ORDERS (Explain any amounts that are different from presumptive amounts in Section VII.)

  1. Current support: $ (presumptive current support from line 20: $ )
  1. Unreimbursed medical expenses: Mother % Father %
  1. Child care contribution: % (OR in conjunction with a finding of noncompliance: $ )
  1. Total arrearage: $ to state to family 38. Arrearage payment: $
  1. Total child support award (exclusive of percentage amounts): $
  1. Additional orders (if any):

PREPARED BY TITLE DATE